Smart Watches
#1
Genuine question :-
Is anyone aware of a smart watch that monitors BP and heart rates that give an alarm if they are incorrect?
Most just show or record data, but I cannot see one that gives an actual alarm when/if a problem is happening.
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#2
Gonna be difficult to strap a nurse or GP to your wrist.
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#3
(01-15-2020, 06:09 PM)Geralous Wrote: Gonna be difficult to strap a nurse or GP to your wrist.

It will become more important as technology evolves. 
This is why people have sudden heart attacks and strokes - simply because they are not aware the BP or Heart rate is wrong.
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#4
(01-15-2020, 06:07 PM)Remi_Moses Wrote: Genuine question :-
Is anyone aware of a smart watch that monitors BP and heart rates that give an alarm if they are incorrect?
Most just show or record data, but I cannot see one that gives an actual alarm when/if a problem is happening.

I'd have a look at what Garmin or Suunto have to offer, but be aware that some of these multi function watches drain the battery in no time. Not sure if any of them are rechargeable, so it's worth bearing in mind.

I've had a Suunto Altimax for about 17/18 years, but it's pretty basic by present day standards and doesn't do any of the monitoring stuff you asked about.

Edit: I frequently see runners with what looks like a mobile phone strapped to their upper arm. I'm guessing that would be some kind of monitor.
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#5
The amount of people I see at work nowadays wearing these things in meetings is ridiculous.

What happened to a nice tag or omega? Much more professional.
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#6
(01-15-2020, 06:33 PM)Ossian Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 06:07 PM)Remi_Moses Wrote: Genuine question :-
Is anyone aware of a smart watch that monitors BP and heart rates that give an alarm if they are incorrect?
Most just show or record data, but I cannot see one that gives an actual alarm when/if a problem is happening.

I'd have a look at what Garmin or Suunto have to offer, but be aware that some of these multi function watches drain the battery in no time. Not sure if any of them are rechargeable, so it's worth bearing in mind.

I've had a Suunto Altimax for about 17/18 years, but it's pretty basic by present day standards and doesn't do any of the monitoring stuff you asked about.

Edit: I frequently see runners with what looks like a mobile phone strapped to their upper arm. I'm guessing that would be some kind of monitor.
That would be a mobile phone they have strapped to themselves. 
As to OP’s question, it sounds like you are after something that monitors BP and heart rate then gives an alarm if it goes outside “the norm”. I think the problem there may be that what is normal for one person isn’t necessarily the norm for another. And what if you were to wear it when doing something that raises these such as exercising / watching the Albion ?
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#7
You really shouldn’t need to test your more than BP twice daily unless you are acutely unwell. If you’re that much at risk then you should probably explore medical or surgical intervention - recurrent stroke has a range of surgical and medical treatments. For high BP or cholesterol - beta blockers, statins, gene therapy. Of course traditionally, reduced alcohol, tobacco, fat, salt, weight and increased exercise and mindfulness/relaxation exercises will also help.

In fact, overtesting may lead to false positive, false negatives and the worried we’ll become unwell.

Unless a HOSPITAL doctor has told you you need to monitor it constantly I struggle to see why you’d want to.

They (smart watch BP monitors) do exist though.
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#8
I have a Fitbit but I have to say it’s a slippery slope. I wear the bloody thing all the time, check my quality of sleep in the morning, and my resting heart rate for a person of my age. It’s made me more neurotic- as the post above says, avoid the thing unless you need it.
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#9
(01-15-2020, 06:13 PM)Remi_Moses Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 06:09 PM)Geralous Wrote: Gonna be difficult to strap a nurse or GP to your wrist.

It will become more important as technology evolves. 
This is why people have sudden heart attacks and strokes - simply because they are not aware the BP or Heart rate is wrong.

How would you know if this was wrong?

I'm no expert - but this looks pretty wrong to me!  Confused

[Image: 2380-5.jpg]
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#10
(01-15-2020, 08:11 PM)baggpuss Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 06:13 PM)Remi_Moses Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 06:09 PM)Geralous Wrote: Gonna be difficult to strap a nurse or GP to your wrist.

It will become more important as technology evolves. 
This is why people have sudden heart attacks and strokes - simply because they are not aware the BP or Heart rate is wrong.

How would you know if this was wrong?

I'm no expert - but this looks pretty wrong to me!  Confused

[Image: 2380-5.jpg]

BG it's not quite what I had in mind  Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
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