Inflammatory language
#1
Last night in Parliament Johnson was asked not to use language like, "traitor", "betrayal" and "surrender bill" as it is provocative and inflammatory. MPs often get death threats to them and their families as emotions are running so high in the country at the moment, with the murder of Jo Cox referenced. MPs suggested that it's their responsibility, starting from the PM, to offer a more conciliatory tone rather than driving people further apart.  

He responded with "never heard such humbug in my life" and refused to temper his language. 

a) I tend to agree with the MPs, throwing terms like surrender, betrayal around just encourages extreme views and actions. Whilst I am fond of the odd Facebook comment I do try to avoid being too inflammatory and when called a 'remoaner' or some such, I'll have a go at explaining why language like that isn't helpful. Never works but hey ho.

b) with all of the above in mind, Boris John is without a doubt an absoute, card-carrying, fucking cunt of the highest order.
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#2
The Jo Cox reference was bizarre. But it cuts both ways though. Brexit supporters being spat at in the street and called racist scum. The likes of Soubry stiring hatred against them.
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#3
You're right, it does which is why I try to avoid using such language. I've been guilty of it in the past when emotions were high (I live in France and work for a UK travel company so my job and home are directly threatened by Brexit which can sometimes get me a bit upset...) it can be very hard not to descent into anger when one's livelihood or access to necessary medicine is *perceived* to be threatened but it doesn't achieve anything and we can only try to do better can't we!

Also, and I'm not suggesting you're the only one guilty of it plenty of Remain posters are as well, this bored could do with cutting out the rife Whataboutism, which is inflammatory in of itself. Everyone on all sides needs to stop seeing criticism and debate as an 'attack'
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#4
Can you imagine how toxic it would get nationally if there is a 2nd referendum.
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#5
Bojos just a lovable scamp aye he, can everyone do what he wants now please   Rolleyes
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#6
Johnson is not equipped to be Prime Minister; let's get that out of the way first.

What we saw yesterday was someone with a sense of entitlement and privilege; someone who believes getting his own way is simply the natural order of things. The response when he couldn't was the tantrum of a man-child.

He has lost control of the agenda by virtue of his own incompetence and attempts to - for want of a better phrase - pull a few strokes. He knows there's going to be a general election, and that it's not far off; what's really bugging him is that he's no longer in a position to manipulate the timing. The opposition parties just need to hold their nerve, ignore the "chicken", "frit", "surrender bill" and other infantile jibes and just keep watching him unravel. The longer he's held up to the spotlight, the worse it gets; for him.
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#7
The opposition parties don't look to have competent leaders either. While Corbyn may be fun for a while the lasting damage he would do is scary. Swinson comes across as an 18 year old student activist.
Personally just wish there could be some compromise. A slighty improved version of the May Withdrawal Agreement. But positions now seem so entrenched I'm not sure that will happen. The ERG and Brexit party on one side demanding no deal. The EU extremists on the other demanding revoking Article 50.
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#8
(09-26-2019, 07:23 AM)ChamonixBaggie Wrote: You're right, it does which is why I try to avoid using such language. I've been guilty of it in the past when emotions were high (I live in France and work for a UK travel company so my job and home are directly threatened by Brexit which can sometimes get me a bit upset...) it can be very hard not to descent into anger when one's livelihood or access to necessary medicine is *perceived* to be threatened but it doesn't achieve anything and we can only try to do better can't we!

Also, and I'm not suggesting you're the only one guilty of it plenty of Remain posters are as well, this bored could do with cutting out the rife Whataboutism, which is inflammatory in of itself. Everyone on all sides needs to stop seeing criticism and debate as an 'attack'
First of all, can I commend you for using the word  “perceived “, which is correct, rather than ‘will be’ which is not and inflammatory.
You say you have “been guilty in the past” of using such language. In fact, you have in this thread! “Boris Johnson is...  a f***ing c**t” is hardly conciliatory. Even if it is correct Big Grin  Or the post “Now get back to work, Dick Head.” 
Still, nice measured post.
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#9
(09-26-2019, 08:36 AM)John Osborne’s Knuckle Wrote: First of all, can I commend you for using the word  “perceived “, which is correct, rather than ‘will be’ which is not and inflammatory.
You say you have “been guilty in the past” of using such language. In fact, you have in this thread! “Boris Johnson is...  a f***ing c**t” is hardly conciliatory. Even if it is correct Big Grin  Or the post “Now get back to work, Dick Head.” 
Still, nice measured post.

Yeah well - as far as I'm concerned Johnson, by dint of refusing to temper his own inflammatory language and just generally being a completely awful human being, has forfeited his right to civility. He's the exception to my rule Big Grin

Regarding perceptions - I'm going to choose to believe Brexiteers think that travel and tourism won't be adversely affected and that I won't lose my job or be kicked out of my home. I might disagree but the alternative is that they all hate me and my colleagues for some reason which can't be true Smile Smile

For the coming winter we've hired 50% EU nationals instead of 100% Brits so that we can still run a minimal program in a worst case scenario where all Brits get shipped back. Mostly Irish and reps from Greece/Spain who work for us in the summer but not usually the winter so British jobs have already been affected in my sector. All of us permanent staff have got to shlep down to the nearest prefecture 1.5hrs away to apply for a residency permit (once Brexit is decided one way or the other) which isn't ideal but not the end of the world.
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#10
It's pointless trying to argue now and we need to go through this to understand the issues that arise. My neighbour is a pharmacist and they are already struggling with getting enough medicines, that's not perceived, that's real. Now there may be a reasonable explanation there that medicines are being rationed because of the uncertainty which might not occur. But the reality is that at this point in time there is trouble in getting medicine now - not perceived.

The prime minister is a disgrace, this is the leader of our country and he treats the constitution with complete disregard because it doesn't suit his needs. He has no humility or grace and that is what the world will see and that reflects this country. The language he uses is purely to give the impression of the people vs the establishment. It's pure populist bollox.

I try generally to keep it civil but when attacked I will respond in the same vein because I won't be bullied or conned on a subject that I can see will cause big issues. That is from experience of working for some of the biggest global companies for the past decade and more.

If I jumped of a cliff I could perceive that I would get smashed against the rocks and die, I have no direct proof of that as I haven't done it, but my experience tells me that is what will happen.
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