I wonder what Fosun's losses are on this
#1
http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/articles/3...ises-stake
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#2
The chinese won't be bothered about the losses per se, their investment models work on long term values. They will see the potential to increase the market value of the business.

It also gives them a cash generative business in the West, which they will in turn use to invest into other businesses, such as Wolves.
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#3
I don't think that Thomas Cook is particularly cash generative at the moment or foreseeable future.
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#4
(05-17-2019, 11:24 AM)baggiebloke Wrote: I don't think that Thomas Cook is particularly cash generative at the moment or foreseeable future.

Airlines aren't generally profile.
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#5
(05-17-2019, 11:43 AM)garryowensneck Wrote:
(05-17-2019, 11:24 AM)baggiebloke Wrote: I don't think that Thomas Cook is particularly cash generative at the moment or foreseeable future.

Airlines aren't generally profile.

But at the year-end they did have £2.5bn in cash.You reverse takeover TUI into Fosun, issuing Fosun shares in payment.

I'm sure Prag will explain why you can't do it, though  Smile
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#6
The airline industry has been profitable for donkeys years. Obviously some firms fail.

Fosun bought a large chunk of travel agent Thomas Cook immediately prior to the shares crashing. 

With Brexit uncertainty, no sign of price recovery soon. That may be seen as an opportunity, but a risky one.
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#7
See they have a stake in a circus as well, seems they like investing in clowns.
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