We don’t need no education...
#1
Hey Education Secretary leave them kids alone... 

Just another day...
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#2
£15 billion?

They'd be better off dividing that sum by the amount of kids currently in education and putting it in a trust fund for them to access when they're 18.
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#3
(06-03-2021, 08:50 AM)Protheroe Wrote: £15 billion?

They'd be better off dividing that sum by the amount of kids currently in education and putting it in a trust fund for them to access when they're 18.

Did you think organising out of hours teaching, attracting highly qualified people to early years teaching from areas in the private sector, increasing the number of children able to get early years teaching and catching up on £100bn worth of lost teaching over the last 14 months would be cheap or something?
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#4
I still can’t believe that kids are not able to read by the time they reach secondary school. My nippers have been tested about twice a week on one thing or another since they were about 5. That is not purely a question of resources.
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#5
(06-03-2021, 08:50 AM)Protheroe Wrote: £15 billion?

They'd be better off dividing that sum by the amount of kids currently in education and putting it in a trust fund for them to access when they're 18.

Jesus wept, they can't all go and DJ for a year before deciding what they would do with that £1,250 each.

(06-03-2021, 09:57 AM)Fido Wrote: I still can’t believe that kids are not able to read by the time they reach secondary school. My nippers have been tested about twice a week on one thing or another since they were about 5. That is not purely a question of resources.

A friend on mine works with deprived kids and those with special needs and links between social care, schools and the emergency services where needed. She works 12 hours a day and weekends trying to deal with the caseload and is generally stressed beyond belief because she wants to do the best she can for the kids in her remit. It is really labour intensive and there are far too few of them to do this so many kids fall between the cracks.

A lot of these kids won't even make it to school on a regular basis and when they do are afraid to get too involved because it will highlight their deficiencies in the basics. Some of the horror stories that I hear about some of the parents are awful, but then there are the parents who want to try but don't have the resource or education themselves.
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#6
(06-03-2021, 09:57 AM)Fido Wrote: I still can’t believe that kids are not able to read by the time they reach secondary school. My nippers have been tested about twice a week on one thing or another since they were about 5. That is not purely a question of resources.

It is if the families fail them or cannot do the basics themselves. Who else is going to help, try and raise the aspirations of those children? Are those who help them expected to do it for free?
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#7
(06-03-2021, 09:17 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(06-03-2021, 08:50 AM)Protheroe Wrote: £15 billion?

They'd be better off dividing that sum by the amount of kids currently in education and putting it in a trust fund for them to access when they're 18.

Did you think organising out of hours teaching, attracting highly qualified people to early years teaching from areas in the private sector, increasing the number of children able to get early years teaching and catching up on £100bn worth of lost teaching over the last 14 months would be cheap or something?

No, but I think a blanket approach costing £15bn is a pointless exercise.
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#8
(06-03-2021, 12:28 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(06-03-2021, 09:17 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(06-03-2021, 08:50 AM)Protheroe Wrote: £15 billion?

They'd be better off dividing that sum by the amount of kids currently in education and putting it in a trust fund for them to access when they're 18.

Did you think organising out of hours teaching, attracting highly qualified people to early years teaching from areas in the private sector, increasing the number of children able to get early years teaching and catching up on £100bn worth of lost teaching over the last 14 months would be cheap or something?

No, but I think a blanket approach costing £15bn is a pointless exercise.

I'm guessing by that statement you have no idea what plans were put forward do you. Do you really believe that the £15bn figure had not substance behind it and was just a sum of money to be thrown at the problem without any costed steps behind it.
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#9
It wasn't a blanket approach, I suggest you read the Times article on Sir Kevan Collin's resignation. The money being asked for was to be divied up into various applied schemes targeting various shortcomings at all age groups as well as an allowance for individual schools to target areas they've failed at meeting over the last 14 months. In fact, I listed some of them for you.
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#10
Solved the problem lads, we shall just get some charity boxes / tins made for each school and get the sixth form students to go chugging around town centres. Or perhaps the more well off can sponsor a pupil in a deprived area. After all charity is the answer to any problem other than getting your bins collected and buying a great big boat / sorry ship. Yours Proth and co
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