For the runners amongst you all
#21
(10-13-2021, 02:37 PM)KratosBaggie Wrote: I joined a gym last week, in order to get rid of post lockdown man boobs.

I went expecting to only manage 5 minutes on the treadmill, which would be fine, as I planned to build up week-on-week. However, I was pleasantly surprised to manage 20 mins right off the bat, and run about 1.8 miles.

Anyway, my point/question is, if I ran on the road, I'm convinced there's no way I'd have managed 20 mins. Obviously terrain, such as hills, makes a difference, but I didn't expect the difference to be so much.

Anyway, that's my boring post of the day out the way.

And don't laugh at the timings, I'm not as fit as I used to be, and enjoy beer and kebabs too much!

A lot of running 'experts' online will slam treadmills, personally I think they're a great way to train whilst reducing the amount of stress through your body. Particularly for runners who've struggled with persistent injuries.

The reason you're finding it noticeably more difficult on the road is that treadmills are much softer and aid leg turnover. Get out a few times a week on the road, walk for a minute, run for a minute, alternate for 20 minutes. Keep working at that, make the run intervals longer and the walks shorter and in no time you'll be running for 20 minutes/half an hour no problem at all. 

If your body is not used to it, it's going to hurt. You've got to be seriously strong to churn out consistent high mileage.
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#22
(10-13-2021, 03:13 PM)Ted Maul Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 02:37 PM)KratosBaggie Wrote: I joined a gym last week, in order to get rid of post lockdown man boobs.

I went expecting to only manage 5 minutes on the treadmill, which would be fine, as I planned to build up week-on-week. However, I was pleasantly surprised to manage 20 mins right off the bat, and run about 1.8 miles.

Anyway, my point/question is, if I ran on the road, I'm convinced there's no way I'd have managed 20 mins. Obviously terrain, such as hills, makes a difference, but I didn't expect the difference to be so much.

Anyway, that's my boring post of the day out the way.

And don't laugh at the timings, I'm not as fit as I used to be, and enjoy beer and kebabs too much!

A lot of running 'experts' online will slam treadmills, personally I think they're a great way to train whilst reducing the amount of stress through your body. Particularly for runners who've struggled with persistent injuries.

The reason you're finding it noticeably more difficult on the road is that treadmills are much softer and aid leg turnover. Get out a few times a week on the road, walk for a minute, run for a minute, alternate for 20 minutes. Keep working at that, make the run intervals longer and the walks shorter and in no time you'll be running for 20 minutes/half an hour no problem at all. 

If your body is not used to it, it's going to hurt. You've got to be seriously strong to churn out consistent high mileage.

I don’t like running on a treadmill, but that’s mainly because I hate running on the same spot for an extended period of time.
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#23
(10-13-2021, 04:54 PM)Duffers Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 03:13 PM)Ted Maul Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 02:37 PM)KratosBaggie Wrote: I joined a gym last week, in order to get rid of post lockdown man boobs.

I went expecting to only manage 5 minutes on the treadmill, which would be fine, as I planned to build up week-on-week. However, I was pleasantly surprised to manage 20 mins right off the bat, and run about 1.8 miles.

Anyway, my point/question is, if I ran on the road, I'm convinced there's no way I'd have managed 20 mins. Obviously terrain, such as hills, makes a difference, but I didn't expect the difference to be so much.

Anyway, that's my boring post of the day out the way.

And don't laugh at the timings, I'm not as fit as I used to be, and enjoy beer and kebabs too much!

A lot of running 'experts' online will slam treadmills, personally I think they're a great way to train whilst reducing the amount of stress through your body. Particularly for runners who've struggled with persistent injuries.

The reason you're finding it noticeably more difficult on the road is that treadmills are much softer and aid leg turnover. Get out a few times a week on the road, walk for a minute, run for a minute, alternate for 20 minutes. Keep working at that, make the run intervals longer and the walks shorter and in no time you'll be running for 20 minutes/half an hour no problem at all. 

If your body is not used to it, it's going to hurt. You've got to be seriously strong to churn out consistent high mileage.

I don’t like running on a treadmill, but that’s mainly because I hate running on the same spot for an extended period of time.

Run on grass if you can - makes a huge difference!
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#24
(10-13-2021, 04:54 PM)Duffers Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 03:13 PM)Ted Maul Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 02:37 PM)KratosBaggie Wrote: I joined a gym last week, in order to get rid of post lockdown man boobs.

I went expecting to only manage 5 minutes on the treadmill, which would be fine, as I planned to build up week-on-week. However, I was pleasantly surprised to manage 20 mins right off the bat, and run about 1.8 miles.

Anyway, my point/question is, if I ran on the road, I'm convinced there's no way I'd have managed 20 mins. Obviously terrain, such as hills, makes a difference, but I didn't expect the difference to be so much.

Anyway, that's my boring post of the day out the way.

And don't laugh at the timings, I'm not as fit as I used to be, and enjoy beer and kebabs too much!

A lot of running 'experts' online will slam treadmills, personally I think they're a great way to train whilst reducing the amount of stress through your body. Particularly for runners who've struggled with persistent injuries.

The reason you're finding it noticeably more difficult on the road is that treadmills are much softer and aid leg turnover. Get out a few times a week on the road, walk for a minute, run for a minute, alternate for 20 minutes. Keep working at that, make the run intervals longer and the walks shorter and in no time you'll be running for 20 minutes/half an hour no problem at all. 

If your body is not used to it, it's going to hurt. You've got to be seriously strong to churn out consistent high mileage.

I don’t like running on a treadmill, but that’s mainly because I hate running on the same spot for an extended period of time.

I struggle with spraining and twisting my ankles (I fully blame 3g pitches for that, but that's another thread), so the treadmill is ideal. I tried running around a local park, a few months back, and really struggled, both with fitness and the enjoyment of it, and I really felt the aches and pains caused by the stress of running on uneven terrain. 

I also like the treadmill, as I can place my phone on the stand, and watch Netflix or whatever, so find it a lot less boring.

I'll see how it goes, and whether I keep it up!

(10-13-2021, 03:13 PM)Ted Maul Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 02:37 PM)KratosBaggie Wrote: I joined a gym last week, in order to get rid of post lockdown man boobs.

I went expecting to only manage 5 minutes on the treadmill, which would be fine, as I planned to build up week-on-week. However, I was pleasantly surprised to manage 20 mins right off the bat, and run about 1.8 miles.

Anyway, my point/question is, if I ran on the road, I'm convinced there's no way I'd have managed 20 mins. Obviously terrain, such as hills, makes a difference, but I didn't expect the difference to be so much.

Anyway, that's my boring post of the day out the way.

And don't laugh at the timings, I'm not as fit as I used to be, and enjoy beer and kebabs too much!

A lot of running 'experts' online will slam treadmills, personally I think they're a great way to train whilst reducing the amount of stress through your body. Particularly for runners who've struggled with persistent injuries.

The reason you're finding it noticeably more difficult on the road is that treadmills are much softer and aid leg turnover. Get out a few times a week on the road, walk for a minute, run for a minute, alternate for 20 minutes. Keep working at that, make the run intervals longer and the walks shorter and in no time you'll be running for 20 minutes/half an hour no problem at all. 

If your body is not used to it, it's going to hurt. You've got to be seriously strong to churn out consistent high mileage.

Yeah, I've done a quick Google (nothing too deep), as I was curious about why there was such a difference between outdoor and treadmill running, and found a number of people hating on treadmills. I didn't know such a relatively boring subject could gather such hate, but this is the internet, I guess ??
Clarnet v2.0
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#25
Just signed up for the Greenwich Park 10k next month.
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#26
(10-12-2021, 03:10 PM)baggy1 Wrote: I downloaded it last night and started having a look - it looks at strengthening exercises first then running technique so I will update if it does any good for me. Thanks Baggpuss btw

Strengthening exercises, and yoga, have made a massive difference to my running.

I have PT sessions once a week with a guy who is a serious runner (he's got a sub 2hr 30 marathon).

All the work is focus on straightening and working on areas where I used to get pain on long runs (mainly my hips).

I've been doing yoga pretty much every day since the first lockdown, and that has really helped.
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#27
Been doing yoga two or three times a week myself which has helped generally with my fitness. If someone would have told me when I hit 30 that yoga was something that could be so beneficial I would have scoffed, but unless you do it you don't realise how hard it is.

Next step is to get the missus to video me running so I can work out where my foot plant is - I suspect I'm over reaching judging by what the book says and how that ties in with my injuries.
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#28
Supposed to be doing the Great South Run on Sunday but it would appear that the Wife has caught COVID from the little darlings that she teaches. i have suddenly developed brutal cough but still testing negative on lateral flow, hoping to still run.
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#29
Sounds like yoga /strengthening are worth doing and might reduce aches and pains as well as hopefully make me a bit less slow. Any yoga / strengthening youtube vids anyone can recommend?
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#30
(10-14-2021, 02:04 PM)TartanRug Wrote: Sounds like yoga /strengthening are worth doing and might reduce aches and pains as well as hopefully make me a bit less slow. Any yoga / strengthening youtube vids anyone can recommend?

I get mine through Apple fitness+ but have to choose the lessons taught by Dustin rather than the ones taught by Jessica because the missus thinks I'm just perving.
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