Brexit Gains 2
#11
(08-30-2021, 06:24 AM)JOK Wrote:
(08-30-2021, 12:29 AM)Madness Wrote: Brexit will be fine. Derek Hardballs will be crying into his sheet with the lyrics of red flag
 
 “Why are Brexiteers so angry. They were angry, shouty and reactionary before the referendum… and they are still angry, shouty and reactionary.”
 
https://wbaunofficial.org.uk/showthread.php?tid=47 [29\01\2019]
 
Wrote a person who has started, at least,  44 rants, sorry threads, about Brexit and stuck his oar in numerous others since March 2019.
Obsessed, I’d call it                   and hypocritical.

(08-29-2021, 07:15 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Manufacturing

Strange. Latest figures show that exports to the EU were higher, in June and July 2021, than the corresponding months pre pandemic. They also show we also imported less from the EU and more from other parts of the world.  
 
Good, independent source you chose there; The London Economic was generally supportive of Jeremy Corbyn. The website took a pro-Remain standpoint on the EU referendum. The London Economic proclaimed itself to predominately appeal to an audience of "young professionals predominately based in London" i.e.  those that consider themselves the Metropolitan elite. In their own words, “ The London Economic (TLE) is a digital newspaper with a genuine London mindset. We support liberal, progressive, pro-European and pro-business viewpoints and look to counter the spread of far-right rhetoric dominating the mainstream media.”   “ As a London newspaper catering for a genuine London mindset we take a pessimistic view of the Brexit process”   (No wonder you read it.)  And as we know the London centric types have the rest of the country's interests at heart, don’t they?

Obsessed
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#12
Remainers are obsessed they want to get back into an all-white group and not look at the big world we have out there
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#13
(08-30-2021, 07:53 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote:
(08-30-2021, 06:24 AM)JOK Wrote:  

(08-29-2021, 07:15 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Manufacturing

Strange. Latest figures show that exports to the EU were higher, in June and July 2021, than the corresponding months pre pandemic. They also show we also imported less from the EU and more from other parts of the world.  
 
Good, independent source you chose there; ...  The website took a pro-Remain standpoint on the EU referendum... proclaimed itself to predominately appeal to an audience of "young professionals predominately based in London"... In their own words, “ The London Economic (TLE) is a digital newspaper with a genuine London mindset. We support liberal, progressive, pro-European    “ As a London newspaper catering for a genuine London mindset we take a pessimistic view of the Brexit process”   (No wonder you read it.)  And as we know the London centric types have the rest of the country's interests at heart, don’t they?

Obsessed

Again, obfuscation but no observations or answers to the points. Do you think failing to address rebuttals wins your point?
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#14
Witherspoons
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#15
(09-01-2021, 06:57 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Witherspoons

Still no answers then?

Did you see the bit about "Strikes"? NO, thought not.
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#16
(08-28-2021, 12:15 PM)Malcolm Tucker Wrote:
(08-28-2021, 11:35 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: The UK government are going to legalise the selling off of private data without consent by scrapping GDPR, that's a benefit for advertisers but I'm not sure it is for everyone else...

Now that is a benefit and a half. GDPR is a complete and utter pain in the arse - clearly dreamt up by someone who’s never either run a business or work a normal job in their life.

It really isn't Malc, most companies have got their head around GDPR now and have systems in place to manage it. It is also a good law to protect the individual against the large companies from doing what they want with the data, we are already bombarded with communications, imagine a world without restrictions and the risks to the vulnerable through misuse of their data. Add to that the restrictions that would be placed on UK companies in transferring data to, and from, the EU to continue their business if we suddenly lost our 'adequate' status with the EU and then you would see a whole world of pain for the UK. Scrapping GDPR or it's equivalent in the DPA 2018 (UK GDPR) would be a disaster and set us back years.
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#17
I see unelected bureaucrat Lord Frost wants to renegotiate the Brexit deal negotiated by Lord Frost again

Not my quote but a bloke of Twitter called Dave, seems pretty accurate though.
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#18
Malcolm Tucker Wrote:
Borin' Baggie Wrote:The UK government are going to legalise the selling off of private data without consent by scrapping GDPR, that's a benefit for advertisers but I'm not sure it is for everyone else...

Now that is a benefit and a half. GDPR is a complete and utter pain in the arse - clearly dreamt up by someone who’s never either run a business or work a normal job in their life.

It's to help protect YOUR data from the many corporate and non-corporate crooks out there !
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#19
Yet more Brexit gains! Rejoice at cutting red tape!

Not satisfied with this brilliant outcome here’s another…

We don’t need the EU customers!
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#20
(09-05-2021, 12:39 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Yet more Brexit gains! Rejoice at cutting red tape!

Not satisfied with this brilliant outcome here’s another…

We don’t need the EU customers!

So, the first article is from January.  “Bad for business” is it?  I repeat, in case you have ignored forgotten   Angel ;   figures show that exports to the EU were higher, in June and July 2021, than the corresponding months pre pandemic.  They also show we also imported less from the EU


But if you like dated here is one of those industry / expert reports you love;

“The UK food and grocery industry is forecast to grow by £24.1bn, or 12.5%, by 2024, bringing the market to a total value of £217.7bn, according to the latest forecasts from research organisation” IGD
UK food sales to grow by £24bn by 2024 (igd.com)

Or a July 2021 one. which shows the same thing.
UK: food and grocery growth forecast 2024 | Statista.

Or a September 2021 one from the Food and Drink Federation:
“Exports towards non-EU countries showing signs of recovery from 2020 and are now worth £4.3bn, or 47% of total exports.
Some of the fastest growing markets are located in Central and South America. The report looks at Mexico ,(with whom we have just signed a new deal) Brazil, Columbia and Chile, in which exports have almost doubled since 2020.
“Exports to the EU fell by 20% compared to last year, France was the only major EU market to see some growth since 2020. … Imports from the EU, which were down 11% from 2020. “
Export statistics | The Food & Drink Federation (fdf.org.uk)

So, things, as we come out of the pandemic and transition our markets are not quite as grim as you like to infer. Not even trade with your beloved EU.
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