In answer to the ageist Dekka
#21
(12-18-2020, 10:12 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Disposable income would also be higher if wages had not stagnated over the last 13 years while living costs have increased.

Indeed, we've all paid a high price for bailing out the banks. Except the boomers, who've seen asset prices soar....
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#22
(12-18-2020, 03:19 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(12-18-2020, 10:12 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Disposable income would also be higher if wages had not stagnated over the last 13 years while living costs have increased.

Indeed, we've all paid a high price for bailing out the banks. Except the boomers, who've seen asset prices soar....

You don't think anybody over 75 is sitting on assets and in receipt of defined benefit pensions?
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#23
(12-17-2020, 08:37 AM)Ted Maul Wrote: How much did it cost your average Boomer to go to university? What proportion of a yearly salary was a house deposit?

Of course there will be some from my generation that do very well and fair play to them, I'm comfortable and I am appreciative of my situation but the vast proportion of Millenials will struggle to be as 'well off' however you want to measure it as their parents.

The average boomer didn't go to university Ted. Very, very few of them did. Instead very, very many started a 6-day week at the age of 15.

Home ownership only really crept up to dominate the tenure mix in the 1970s and 1980s (particularly after the 1977 Rent Act put the final nail in the coffin for the private rented sector, and of course right to buy).

My folks were boomers. we went through stages in the 70s with no car, no colour TV until my old man rented one for Argentina '78 which promptly went back until Espana '82. Bucket and spade holidays in Devon. 33% income tax, 16% interest rates, double-digit inflation.

I'm glad you do appreciate your situation.
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#24
(12-18-2020, 03:22 PM)Ossian Wrote:
(12-18-2020, 03:19 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(12-18-2020, 10:12 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Disposable income would also be higher if wages had not stagnated over the last 13 years while living costs have increased.

Indeed, we've all paid a high price for bailing out the banks. Except the boomers, who've seen asset prices soar....

You don't think anybody over 75 is sitting on assets and in receipt of defined benefit pensions?

Of course I don't.
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#25
(12-18-2020, 03:19 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(12-18-2020, 10:12 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Disposable income would also be higher if wages had not stagnated over the last 13 years while living costs have increased.

Indeed, we've all paid a high price for bailing out the banks. Except the boomers, who've seen asset prices soar....

And the people that have bought gold of course  Cool  If you are talking about houses then I'm pretty sure that other generations have also 'made money' from rising house prices. Still one may actually be thought about as a home rather than an asset, and something to leave to the following generation and the other has no alternate purpose whatsoever. And both add nowt to anyone's income unless you realise the value of the asset.
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#26
Protheroe Wrote:
Ted Maul Wrote:How much did it cost your average Boomer to go to university? What proportion of a yearly salary was a house deposit?

Of course there will be some from my generation that do very well and fair play to them, I'm comfortable and I am appreciative of my situation but the vast proportion of Millenials will struggle to be as 'well off' however you want to measure it as their parents.

The average boomer didn't go to university Ted. Very, very few of them did. Instead very, very many started a 6-day week at the age of 15.

Home ownership only really crept up to dominate the tenure mix in the 1970s and 1980s (particularly after the 1977 Rent Act put the final nail in the coffin for the private rented sector, and of course right to buy).

My folks were boomers. we went through stages in the 70s with no car, no colour TV until my old man rented one for Argentina '78 which promptly went back until Espana '82. Bucket and spade holidays in Devon. 33% income tax, 16% interest rates, double-digit inflation.

I'm glad you do appreciate your situation.

….plus they had normally started work before they turned 25.
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#27
no doubt in my my mind the under 40s/30s and the >20s will bear the brunt of the issues in society we are seeing. you only have to take our response to covid to see how imbalanced it is generationally and how the cost of the upheavals we are seeing will fall on those who will be paying for it all

but then it was probably forever thus. but conceptually the argument that a certain section of people are directly responsible (it was the students, then the old uns, then the Gen X blah blah) for anything is, if you know anything about complex systems and their theory completely ludicrous

society has always been under upheaval. it's no different now, climate response, brexit, new respiratory strains, economic rebalancing, globalisation, the pace of technological change, resource mgt, growth of the non-western world, aggregation of "power" in a few and fewer entities etc etc whats different now is the confluence of all that with the information superhighway and the access to mind of virtually everyone on the planet at the press of a button. i'm no tin foil hat chap but Schwab at WEF is a raving lunatic for example and he is one person who can use these new tools

unfortunately in the uk with a non-functional govt and opposition (no matter your politics) and a hundreds of uk unelected tsars, advisors, scientists, financiers and technologists (and brexit wanted elected officials to underpin our sovereignty oh the irony) means all ages need to come together and try to influence change

that was longer than I expected for a first post but blaming one and another at the microscopic level, for taking individual decisions on a day to day month by month basis for the good of them, their family and their local community, based on age is frankly embarrassingly facile given the societal issues at hand
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#28
(12-19-2020, 09:51 AM)Albiono Wrote: no doubt in my my mind the under 40s/30s and the >20s will bear the brunt of the issues in society we are seeing. you only have to take our response to covid to see how imbalanced it is generationally and how the cost of the upheavals we are seeing will fall on those who will be paying for it all

but then it was probably forever thus. but conceptually the argument that a certain section of people are directly responsible (it was the students, then the old uns, then the Gen X blah blah) for anything is, if you know anything about complex systems and their theory completely ludicrous

society has always been under upheaval. it's no different now, climate response, brexit, new respiratory strains, economic rebalancing, globalisation, the pace of technological change, resource mgt, growth of the non-western world, aggregation of "power" in a few and fewer entities etc etc whats different now is the confluence of all that with the information superhighway and the access to mind of virtually everyone on the planet at the press of a button. i'm no tin foil hat chap but Schwab at WEF is a raving lunatic for example and he is one person who can use these new tools

unfortunately in the uk with a non-functional govt and opposition (no matter your politics) and a hundreds of uk unelected tsars, advisors, scientists, financiers and technologists (and brexit wanted elected officials to underpin our sovereignty oh the irony) means all ages need to come together and try to influence change

that was longer than I expected for a first post but blaming one and another at the microscopic level, for taking individual decisions on a day to day month by month basis for the good of them, their family and their local community, based on age is frankly embarrassingly facile given the societal issues at hand

You do have to take into account this entire thread was based on someone trying to point score on a false premise. 

However now the thread has become a debate rather than the latter I will add my actual thoughts on what is being discussed. Every generation blames those from the previous generations for the failures politically, economically and socially with good reason as a collective they are are responsible.  That isn’t to say that everyone within those generations are responsible. Many will have found themselves marginalised, out of step with political thought of the time or simply not benefitted from what was happening to them and around them. 

You can however question the decisions made by a generation given they directly or indirectly influenced and changed culture, politics and economics within their lifetimes. You can also thanks to big data informed by social media etc pinpoint age groups in terms of how they vote, what they like and believe. Yes of course there are people who don’t fit into these pigeon holes but you can say that about any grouping of people. I’m quite comfortable with questioning the wisdom of the older generation with regards the housing problems for young people, leaving the EU, voting intentions. I’m also comfortable with the next generations after me moaning at the decisions we as a collective made whether I individually or not was responsible. It’s certainly not fair on some, for example if in the future it’s proven Brexit is a woeful decision I’m going to be a bit miffed to blamed as a individual but I cannot deny that a significant percentage of my peers were responsible. 

This is the way! 

Welcome new poster 

[Image: the-mandalorian-sixth-scale-figure_star-wars_silo.png]All
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#29
(12-19-2020, 11:12 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: You do have to take into account this entire thread was based on someone trying to point score on a false premise

However now the thread has become a debate rather than the latter I will add my actual thoughts on what is being discussed. Every generation blames those from the previous generations for the failures politically, economically and socially with good reason as a collective they are are responsible.  That isn’t to say that everyone within those generations are responsible. Many will have found themselves marginalised, out of step with political thought of the time or simply not benefitted from what was happening to them and around them. 

You can however question the decisions made by a generation given they directly or indirectly influenced and changed culture, politics and economics within their lifetimes. You can also thanks to big data informed by social media etc pinpoint age groups in terms of how they vote, what they like and believe. Yes of course there are people who don’t fit into these pigeon holes but you can say that about any grouping of people. I’m quite comfortable with questioning the wisdom of the older generation with regards the housing problems for young people, leaving the EU, voting intentions. I’m also comfortable with the next generations after me moaning at the decisions we as a collective made whether I individually or not was responsible. It’s certainly not fair on some, for example if in the future it’s proven Brexit is a woeful decision I’m going to be a bit miffed to blamed as a individual but I cannot deny that a significant percentage of my peers were responsible. 

You don’t “question their wisdom” you say they are the “most selfish generation ever”. That is not the same thing. It’s also a claim you have made many times without any evidential back up. You have also accused the majority of being racist. So Now you are calling Boomers Selfish, Racist AND thick!
I question the decision to try and to get 50% of the population to go to university, kids getting into hock, many for worthless degrees, when there are not that many graduate jobs for them all.
I question the wisdom of encouraging mass immigration for political ends.
I question the wisdom  to go to war illegally and a genuine false premise. (though to be fair the main UK instigator of the last two was a boomer)

I question the wisdom of all the millennials attending illegal raves, house and street parties. Selfishly enjoying themselves whilst putting the health and lives of the sick and elderly at risk.



You can not blame an entire generation as "the most selfish" because of the doings of their political masters.

As regards my “False premise” I know what you meant by “they will be long gone” and so do you.
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#30
(12-23-2020, 10:43 AM)JOK Wrote:
(12-19-2020, 11:12 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: You do have to take into account this entire thread was based on someone trying to point score on a false premise

However now the thread has become a debate rather than the latter I will add my actual thoughts on what is being discussed. Every generation blames those from the previous generations for the failures politically, economically and socially with good reason as a collective they are are responsible.  That isn’t to say that everyone within those generations are responsible. Many will have found themselves marginalised, out of step with political thought of the time or simply not benefitted from what was happening to them and around them. 

You can however question the decisions made by a generation given they directly or indirectly influenced and changed culture, politics and economics within their lifetimes. You can also thanks to big data informed by social media etc pinpoint age groups in terms of how they vote, what they like and believe. Yes of course there are people who don’t fit into these pigeon holes but you can say that about any grouping of people. I’m quite comfortable with questioning the wisdom of the older generation with regards the housing problems for young people, leaving the EU, voting intentions. I’m also comfortable with the next generations after me moaning at the decisions we as a collective made whether I individually or not was responsible. It’s certainly not fair on some, for example if in the future it’s proven Brexit is a woeful decision I’m going to be a bit miffed to blamed as a individual but I cannot deny that a significant percentage of my peers were responsible. 

You don’t “question their wisdom” you say they are the “most selfish generation ever”. That is not the same thing. It’s also a claim you have made many times without any evidential back up. You have also accused the majority of being racist. So Now you are calling Boomers Selfish, Racist AND thick!
I question the decision to try and to get 50% of the population to go to university, kids getting into hock, many for worthless degrees, when there are not that many graduate jobs for them all.
I question the wisdom of encouraging mass immigration for political ends.
I question the wisdom  to go to war illegally and a genuine false premise. (though to be fair the main UK instigator of the last two was a boomer)

I question the wisdom of all the millennials attending illegal raves, house and street parties. Selfishly enjoying themselves whilst putting the health and lives of the sick and elderly at risk.

You can not blame an entire generation as "the most selfish" because of the doings of their political masters.


As regards my “False premise” I know what you meant by “they will be long gone” and so do you.

Yes I do, don’t tell me what I meant!. I meant what I said in the explanation. I wasted far too much time answering your obsessive replies have a great Christmas xx
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