Birmingham Clean Air Zone
#1
As this is being introduced at the beginning of June I've clicked on gov.uk to find out which of our cars can go into Brum (if we're feeling particularly masochistic) and which can't without being charged.

Unsurprisingly neither the ancient V8 or V6 are allowed into Brum, but ARE allowed into the Bath CAZ.

How does that work?
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#2
(03-17-2021, 11:43 AM)Protheroe Wrote: As this is being introduced at the beginning of June I've clicked on gov.uk to find out which of our cars can go into Brum (if we're feeling particularly masochistic) and which can't without being charged.

Unsurprisingly neither the ancient V8 or V6 are allowed into Brum, but ARE allowed into the Bath CAZ.

How does that work?
By going "into the Bath" maybe the vehicles are somewhat cleansed?
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#3
Bath has lower levels of particulate emissions, SOx and NOx than Birmingham due to not being in the centre of the second biggest urban area in the country. Therefore Bath has led stringent requirements.

The data this is based on relates to the time taken to reach legal air quality limits.

Bit more detail, Birmingham is expected to reach the optical limits in 2027 with the CAZ, Bath only exceeded the limits last year.
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#4
(03-17-2021, 11:46 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Bath has lower levels of particulate emissions, SOx and NOx than Birmingham due to not being in the centre of the second biggest urban area in the country. Therefore Bath has led stringent requirements.

The data this is based on relates to the time taken to reach legal air quality limits.

Bit more detail, Birmingham is expected to reach the optical limits in 2027 with the CAZ, Bath only exceeded the limits last year.

That clear enough, Proth?
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#5
(03-17-2021, 11:46 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Bath has lower levels of particulate emissions, SOx and NOx than Birmingham due to not being in the centre of the second biggest urban area in the country. Therefore Bath has led stringent requirements.

The data this is based on relates to the time taken to reach legal air quality limits.

Bit more detail, Birmingham is expected to reach the optical limits in 2027 with the CAZ, Bath only exceeded the limits last year.

So every urban area could have a different threshold? Hmm. OK.
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#6
Baths clean air zone doesn’t include a charge for private vehicles. It’s only for taxis, vans, work vehicles, lorries.

Brum’s is based on emissions.
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#7
(03-17-2021, 12:03 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(03-17-2021, 11:46 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Bath has lower levels of particulate emissions, SOx and NOx than Birmingham due to not being in the centre of the second biggest urban area in the country. Therefore Bath has led stringent requirements.

The data this is based on relates to the time taken to reach legal air quality limits.

Bit more detail, Birmingham is expected to reach the optical limits in 2027 with the CAZ, Bath only exceeded the limits last year.

So every urban area could have a different threshold? Hmm. OK.

Does it surprise you that different urban areas need to reduce their carbon emissions at different rates?

Just bite the bullet and get that Tesla that you keep going on about - perfect for roundabouts apparently  Big Grin
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#8
(03-17-2021, 12:06 PM)backsidebaggie Wrote: Baths clean air zone doesn’t include a charge for private vehicles. It’s only for taxis, vans, work vehicles, lorries.

Brum’s is based on emissions.

That makes a lot more sense.
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#9
(03-17-2021, 12:03 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(03-17-2021, 11:46 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Bath has lower levels of particulate emissions, SOx and NOx than Birmingham due to not being in the centre of the second biggest urban area in the country. Therefore Bath has led stringent requirements.

The data this is based on relates to the time taken to reach legal air quality limits.

Bit more detail, Birmingham is expected to reach the optical limits in 2027 with the CAZ, Bath only exceeded the limits last year.

So every urban area could have a different threshold? Hmm. OK.

Yes. Coventry and Nottingham have been exempted from a CAZ as their other mitigations will supposedly render the affects of a CAZ null with respect to legal air quality limits. Manchester is only planning on charging commercial vehicles.

There's effectively two types, non-charging (Bath) and charging (Brum). The latter will be deployed in areas that need serious intervention to reach legal limits and is based on EES whereas the former will generally only apply to commercial vehicles.
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#10
(03-17-2021, 11:49 AM)UCEbaggie Wrote:
(03-17-2021, 11:46 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote: Bath has lower levels of particulate emissions, SOx and NOx than Birmingham due to not being in the centre of the second biggest urban area in the country. Therefore Bath has led stringent requirements.

The data this is based on relates to the time taken to reach legal air quality limits.

Bit more detail, Birmingham is expected to reach the optical limits in 2027 with the CAZ, Bath only exceeded the limits last year.

That clear enough, Proth?

Very good  Big Grin
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