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FLA
#1
Don't know if anybody has posted about this already, but i just wanted to post about the FLA march which took place in London over the weekend. I was there & went along with some of my Albion friends, some of whom are photographed holding an Albion flag in front of Snow Hill Station. The photo made it to Twitter and a number of self entitled albion fans started coming up with snide remarks about how we represent 0.0001% of the clubs fan base. They went on to mention how our club helped break down barriers, rather than build them.

This has made me really angry & upset at the same time. I don't know what's gotten into people in the past few years, but a lot of people like to try and make themselves look like saints on social media and use any chance they're given to throw the racism card about.

The irony is, the march, was a march against extremism. About how our government know that they're are 3000 plus people on the terrorist watch list, roaming the streets of the UK, but seemingly do nothing about it, until it's too late and people are already dead. The parallels between Islamic extremism and the Nazis is there for all to see. Sexism, homophobia, racism, the lack of equality towards women. It's all preached within extremist Islam & that's exactly what we marched against. There were gay people at the march, there were sikhs there, black people, women, children. 

So why, have these Albion fans on twitter, tried to get on their high horse, spouting about something they clearly know nothing about. We marched for equality, to break down barriers. I want my children to be able to walk the streets of this country, to get the tube, public transport, without the fear of some religious nut job letting loose and killing people just because they don't follow Islam. 

There was nothing but amazing people at the march over the weekend & if anybody on here, was one of the people who tweeted in reply to that photo, then you should take a look at yourselves. 

Cheers
PEACE & UNITY
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#2
I was tempted to post something about it about 20mins ago funnily enough, but strangely I couldn't find an accurate article about it online. Just absolute piss from The Independant and various other wank rags. Have a read yourself and you'll see what I mean. Lots of "oh yeah, and Tommy Johnson was there. Oh, and some of them did Nazi salutes. Oh, and they have links with far right groups" ad infinitum.

The lad who did the organising from the Albion side, Jon, is a top bloke. I'm happy to say I donated to the cause a few weeks back.
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#3
(10-09-2017, 11:49 AM)P_K Wrote: I was tempted to post something about it about 20mins ago funnily enough, but strangely I couldn't find an accurate article about it online. Just absolute piss from The Independant and various other wank rags. Have a read yourself and you'll see what I mean. Lots of "oh yeah, and Tommy Johnson was there. Oh, and some of them did Nazi salutes. Oh, and they have links with far right groups" ad infinitum.

The lad who did the organising from the Albion side, Jon, is a top bloke. I'm happy to say I donated to the cause a few weeks back.

Nice one mate. Ye the mainstream media don't like covering it, it's a real shame. When they do take any notice of it, they'll make up some BS about there being hardly anybody there and people doing salutes. I didn't see any of that. If it did happen then it's absolute pathetic & those people didn't understand why were marching. Maybe those people turned up just to try and give us a bad name? Who knows. If TR was there, then so what. I agree with what he says about extremism. Anybody who thinks every muslim is a bad person who supports terrorism, is obviously a thick human being with not much intelligence. The march was about equality and protecting people from a fascists ideology.
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#4
Prepare yourself for snide comments from a handful of fuckwits on here who instantly jump to the "RACIST NAZI" motif. It's so predictable.

I can only comment on what I saw from the Albion side of planning, but they were keen to distance themselves as much as possible from the likes of Tommy Robinson and various others that would put a dim light on the proceedings.

There were kids on the march. Blokes, kids, of all creeds colours and backgrounds. I wasn't there and I wouldn't have gone even if I could have, but I am glad to see it was a success, and nothing unsavoury happened.
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#5
Never heard of it. Just had a dig around on the Twatter.  The FLA Twatter account has plenty of posts about 'the Left', the Main Stream Media and the BBC. Sounds like the UK branch of the Trump campaign.

They seem to be getting angry because nobody had heard of them or their March against extremism. Also have a fucking ridiculous name: the Football Lads Alliance.
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#6
There was an excellent letter in the F365 Mailbox this morning about it. I certainly agree with the below that there are more than a few vague elements to the whole thing. (For the record I'm neither supporting nor condemning the FLA, don't know enough about them to do either).

-----------------------------------

An important mail about the FLA
This a long post, and I appreciate it might be too political or too divisive to discuss in the Mailbox forum, but hopefully this will be published.

This is a topic that many seem to be shying away from, whether it be the wider football community, the media or members of the group themselves, but it’s time to talk about the Football Lads Alliance and what it’s all about

Now, before anyone gets irate, I’m simply making some points and asking some pretty asinine questions. I know people who have attended and I appreciate that you can attend a march for many reasons. You don’t necessarily need to agree with everyone there. This isn’t an attack per se, although one of my reasons for writing in is because nobody feels they can talk about it in any form without adding this caveat.

Football365 is home to many an intelligent contributor and I’m hoping that someone who attended the march can respond with some clarity as to what it’s about because the website/Facebook page isn’t clear, and various conversations I’ve had on other platforms have borne absolutely no fruit.

The premise, as far as I understand, is to show solidarity against all forms of extremism and to pay respects to those who have lost their lives to terrorism. Sounds fair enough to me on the face of it. But after this, it gets a bit vague.

Now, firstly, its almost always positive when people feel strongly enough to march, in a bid to force change. It’s empowering. But whilst I think it’s fair enough to pay respects to the dead and to oppose extremism, as I expect most decent people would, I don’t understand what change is being sought here. What’s more; many people marching don’t seem to know if it’s a march against extremism or a march against Islam. I suppose when you invite Toni Bugle, Mohan Singh and Marie Ann Waters to speak, and welcome Tommy Robinson, all strong anti-Islam advocates, it becomes confusing.

Secondly, too much is being made of how fans of different clubs are coming together for a common cause as if this is evidence of thousands of men putting tribalism to one side for the greater good. From the outside, it doesn’t look like this at all, firstly because most people are able to talk to, mix with and whisper it, be friends with, people who support other football clubs, but mainly, because this is the ultimate form of tribalism – these people have simply found another ‘tribe’ or ‘group’ they hate more than each other. Again, the caveat here is that I don’t believe everyone on this march thinks this way, but many senior figures, including John Meighan, are convicted football hooligans with banning orders, who think they deserve a pat on the back for being able to go out on a Saturday afternoon without kicking people’s heads in.

The movement may well be in good faith, but they need some serious public relations advice. In my opinion, they need to do the following:

1) if they want to invite speakers against extremism, they need to widen their net and appeal outside the echo chamber. To reach out rather than be introspective. If they’re insisting on using the likes of Marie Ann Waters, they are going to appeal to far right types more often than not. They could do worse than approach someone like Maajid Nawaz or other Quilliam members who can give a Muslim view on extremism in their own religion. Too often I hear the throwaway line ‘Muslims don’t do enough to question extremism in their own religion’. Quilliam do. If the thousands of men attending are truly terrified of extremism, it would do them good to know moderate Muslims are also terrified and concerned. Plus it would do the football community a lot of good to be less introspective and help fight ignorant opinions in our sport.

2) Knock the precious attitude on the head. If someone asks what the point of the march is, engage with them. Don’t sit there with your arms folded, scoffing about ‘intolerant lefties’. Not only do you lose the moral high ground by being dismissive, it’s just painfully Farage-esque. Loud and brash with ‘strong opinions’ is all well and good, but when those opinions are fairly challenged, the mask slips and false victimhood seeps in out. It’s unbecoming. Along with this, accept that although you might have honest reasons for marching, that racists/bigots will obviously see this as a validation platform for their hate. I am a traditional voter of the Labour Party, I believe in their overall message, but I also understand that there are anti Semitic elements in their support. The minute you start trying to silence opposition to this sort of thing is the day you start advocating it.

3) Tighten up the narrative. Mainstream media will not pay attention to anything vague like this, especially if it has the faint whiff of racism in the background. Do more to address all forms of extremism. Distance yourselves from bigots and racists rather than inviting them to speak. Again, I know everyone who attended isn’t a racist, but I have typed ‘Islam FLA’ into the Twitter search bar and nastiness is right there under the surface. If I’ve done it, you can rest assured a journalist who’s reputation rests on their output has done the same. It’s no good having this ‘no-one likes us, we don’t care’ attitude like Millwall, because you clearly do care, and your movement needs support to carry on growing. Millwall don’t give a shit, so it works for them. It won’t work for you if you hope to gain support and coverage.


Ross H, THFC fan
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#7
I'll be honest I'm still not sure about what the "end goal" of the march itself though. The intentions seem to be fairly pure and self-policing and the event itself appears to have gone off without too much of a hoo-hah. If it was to raise awareness to radicals I would think it's already in the forefront of most people's minds; if it were to highlight the lack of police resources to combat this then this wasn't completely clear or even if it were suggesting a different approach to the whole issue of fuckwits driving into people. This isn't meant as a criticism as it's all too easy to get in petty snipes against people who are willing to stand up for what they believe in and do something about it but given the lack of coverage and subsequent message deliverance I'm wondering if it was seen as a success or not?
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#8
All decent points, other than point 3. That's not why the media ignored it.

(10-09-2017, 12:16 PM)Fido Wrote: I'll be honest I'm still not sure about what the "end goal" of the march itself though. The intentions seem to be fairly pure and self-policing and the event itself appears to have gone off without too much of a hoo-hah. If it was to raise awareness to radicals I would think it's already in the forefront of most people's minds; if it were to highlight the lack of police resources to combat this then this wasn't completely clear or even if it were suggesting a different approach to the whole issue of fuckwits driving into people. This isn't meant as a criticism as it's all too easy to get in petty snipes against people who are willing to stand up for what they believe in and do something about it but given the lack of coverage and subsequent message deliverance I'm wondering if it was seen as a success or not?

I'm still wondering myself, in all honesty.
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#9
(10-09-2017, 12:08 PM)UCEbaggie Wrote: Never heard of it. Just had a dig around on the Twatter.  The FLA Twatter account has plenty of posts about 'the Left', the Main Stream Media and the BBC. Sounds like the UK branch of the Trump campaign.

They seem to be getting angry because nobody had heard of them or their March against extremism. Also have a fucking ridiculous name: the Football Lads Alliance.
Spot on. I didn't know what the heck it was about either. 
Ridiculous name and the message they're trying to give clearly needs to be more polished if it's as decent as the original poster claims.
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#10
As awful and snobbish as it sounds, the word "lads" does a lot of damage in my opinion.

You just cannot take any group with that word in their name seriously.
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