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Is Uber immoral?
#1
And do we need the State to be our moral guardian?
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#2
Is Uber immoral, I don't know, but I do think there are questions to be asked about how their business model impacts on the people who work for them.

I was thinking about the Labour manifesto and what I liked and wasn't so bothered about. One of the things I wasn't bothered about was nationalising Royal Mail, I am not sure we need a public sector delivery service. But it will be an interesting test for the private sector, as to what happens in the medium to long term, to Royal Mail employees. Will they be able to compete in this business sector, whilst still maintaining the current level of rights that their employees receive.

As to whether the state should be our moral guardian. The easy answer is no. But we can all think of examples where the vast majority of people would accept that the state needs to intercede to stop immoral practice. So for example slavery, I would hope all of us would accept that the state has a duty to protect its citizens from tis practice.

I suspect this is what democracy should be about, the population reaching a consensus as to what degree the state play in our lives.
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#3
+1.

It comes with all the pros and cons of unfettered capitalism.
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#4
Simple if you don't like them don't use them. I prefer a local company in Slovakia rather than them
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#5
(07-11-2017, 09:54 PM)Protheroe Wrote: And do we need the State to be our moral guardian?
No doubt you'll point to the success of the market re Uber and go hey, if the market for lower taxi fayres wasn't there then the market for zero houred/self employed fucks without sick pay wouldn't exist either.

It's a bit low rent and hardly aspirational, imo. Which leads us onto moral guardianship and, well, leadership in general.

It's a sad state of affairs that governments needs to legislate in order to raise the morality bar. Had racial discrimination not been legislated for, terms like 'nigger in the woodpile' could be commonplace. Homosexuals would remain persecuted. Weekends and bank holidays would be the dream of the extremist left.  People are cunts though and need legislation.

These are all moral issues, like it or not, and small-statism, would have left matters to the market.

It's your choice: deliberate marketisation for the benefit of the few and powerful or unintentional incomptence that affects the few (from across the spectrum).
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#6
(07-13-2017, 10:30 PM)SophieX Wrote:
(07-11-2017, 09:54 PM)Protheroe Wrote: And do we need the State to be our moral guardian?
No doubt you'll point to the success of the market re Uber and go hey, if the market for lower taxi fayres wasn't there then the market for zero houred/self employed fucks without sick pay wouldn't exist either.

It's a bit low rent and hardly aspirational, imo. Which leads us onto moral guardianship and, well, leadership in general.

It's a sad state of affairs that governments needs to legislate in order to raise the morality bar. Had racial discrimination not been legislated for, terms like 'nigger in the woodpile' could be commonplace. Homosexuals would remain persecuted. Weekends and bank holidays would be the dream of the extremist left.  People are cunts though and need legislation.

These are all moral issues, like it or not, and small-statism, would have left matters to the market.

It's your choice: deliberate marketisation for the benefit of the few and powerful or unintentional incomptence that affects the few (from across the spectrum).

The odd assertion that markets benefit "the few" ignores all the evidence to the contrary.

Despite legislation there are still racists, mysogynists & homophobes - including many in the legislature. So what moral legitimacy does the legislature have?

I ask the orginal question having been a regular Uber customer in London for several years now. I always ask the driver what s/he thinks of the model, and I've yet to hear a single one complain about it, let alone call it immoral. The only drivers who seem up in arms are the highly regulated and hugely expensive Black Cabs.
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#7
(07-14-2017, 09:06 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(07-13-2017, 10:30 PM)SophieX Wrote:
(07-11-2017, 09:54 PM)Protheroe Wrote: And do we need the State to be our moral guardian?
No doubt you'll point to the success of the market re Uber and go hey, if the market for lower taxi fayres wasn't there then the market for zero houred/self employed fucks without sick pay wouldn't exist either.

It's a bit low rent and hardly aspirational, imo. Which leads us onto moral guardianship and, well, leadership in general.

It's a sad state of affairs that governments needs to legislate in order to raise the morality bar. Had racial discrimination not been legislated for, terms like 'nigger in the woodpile' could be commonplace. Homosexuals would remain persecuted. Weekends and bank holidays would be the dream of the extremist left.  People are cunts though and need legislation.

These are all moral issues, like it or not, and small-statism, would have left matters to the market.

It's your choice: deliberate marketisation for the benefit of the few and powerful or unintentional incomptence that affects the few (from across the spectrum).

The odd assertion that markets benefit "the few" ignores all the evidence to the contrary.

Despite legislation there are still racists, mysogynists & homophobes - including many in the legislature. So what moral legitimacy does the legislature have?

I ask the orginal question having been a regular Uber customer in London for several years now. I always ask the driver what s/he thinks of the model, and I've yet to hear a single one complain about it, let alone call it immoral. The only drivers who seem up in arms are the highly regulated and hugely expensive Black Cabs.

Same

Black cab drivers must be fucking multi-millionaires the prices they charge. One quoted me £35 to the West Ham ground last season from Shoreditch, then we got an uber for less than £15
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#8
Cant help but think you missed your calling when the Natural Law Party was in its pomp Proth.


Ommmmmmmmmmmm.
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#9
ARF!
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#10
(07-14-2017, 09:06 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(07-13-2017, 10:30 PM)SophieX Wrote:
(07-11-2017, 09:54 PM)Protheroe Wrote: And do we need the State to be our moral guardian?
No doubt you'll point to the success of the market re Uber and go hey, if the market for lower taxi fayres wasn't there then the market for zero houred/self employed fucks without sick pay wouldn't exist either.

It's a bit low rent and hardly aspirational, imo. Which leads us onto moral guardianship and, well, leadership in general.

It's a sad state of affairs that governments needs to legislate in order to raise the morality bar. Had racial discrimination not been legislated for, terms like 'nigger in the woodpile' could be commonplace. Homosexuals would remain persecuted. Weekends and bank holidays would be the dream of the extremist left.  People are cunts though and need legislation.

These are all moral issues, like it or not, and small-statism, would have left matters to the market.

It's your choice: deliberate marketisation for the benefit of the few and powerful or unintentional incomptence that affects the few (from across the spectrum).

The odd assertion that markets benefit "the few" ignores all the evidence to the contrary.

Despite legislation there are still racists, mysogynists & homophobes - including many in the legislature. So what moral legitimacy does the legislature have?

I ask the orginal question having been a regular Uber customer in London for several years now. I always ask the driver what s/he thinks of the model, and I've yet to hear a single one complain about it, let alone call it immoral. The only drivers who seem up in arms are the highly regulated and hugely expensive Black Cabs.
+1. I've only really used it in Paris and the drivers love it. No downtime, they do a shift and get paid for almost every minute. You pay a decent price and don't have to tip. In a big city seems to be win-win for me.
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