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The Labour
#1
Weakest Tory government in a generation and Labour still manages to steal the headlines with a major policy split, front bench sackings and the first Corbyn reshuflle of the Parliament.

Fantastic.
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#2
Hopefully the death rattle of the discredited pro eu blairites. They were more upset with the election result than the tories
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#3
Did you see the list of 51
About half should cross the floor and join the Tories
BRadshaw, Sheerman, Bryant, Woodcock, Coyle, Streeting, Eagle etc
Some decent folk on the list so can't tar all with same brush. But if you are a Tory why are you in the Labour Party would be my question
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#4
Where do you see the list?
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#5
https://order-order.com/2017/06/29/101-m...oms-union/
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#6
The problems that have beset the May leadership of late have served to mask the open wounds
within the PLP, these are still going to rumble on and burst to the surface over the coming weeks
and months.

I don't think the problems that the Tories have will go away soon, but it wouldn't surprise me at
all if Jeremy Corbyn's ratings begin to drop again over the coming months, if the efforts by Labour
to try and force a voting crises within parliament fails.
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#7
I'm not sure there is much to see here. Just an attempt at straw clutching by the Conservatives.

Everyone knows that Brexit is difficult for Labourr, approximately two thirds of their 2015 voters, voted remain, but those who voted leave were significant in their geographical location. Labour leave voters were in the main located in traditional non metropolitan labour areas, which were already showing signs of a decline in labour support.

However the Conservatives very kindly alleviated some of this problem for Labour by running a wretched GE campaign.

It is not unreasonable for Labour MPs to back the single market if that is what they told their constituents they would do if elected at the recent election. It is not unreasonable for Corbyn to sack those front bench spokesman who voted against party policy.

Because of the make up of parliament it is going to be far easier for Labour MPs to defy their party whip, than for Conservatives. So inevitable in parliament, there will be a false unity within the Conservative ranks, which demonstrates a party who are collectively afraid of a General Election in the short term.
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#8
I'm afraid I can't let you rewrite history about the "Labour Leave" vote. Labour Leave voters weren't "in the main located in traditional non metropolitan areas" - unless by non-Metropolitan you actually mean "Non-London". How else do you explain Leave's sweeping victory across the West Midlands, South Yorkshire and in large parts of Greater Manchester and Tyne & Wear?

The Conservatives are very good at false unity by the way. There is a reason they're the most enduring political party in any western democracy.
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#9
Does anyone know the full total of mp's that have either resigned from the Labour shadow cabinet or been booted out whilst Corbyn has been leader?
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#10
(06-30-2017, 10:03 AM)Protheroe Wrote: I'm afraid I can't let you rewrite history about the "Labour Leave" vote. Labour Leave voters weren't "in the main located in traditional non metropolitan areas" - unless by non-Metropolitan you actually mean "Non-London". How else do you explain Leave's sweeping victory across the West Midlands, South Yorkshire and in large parts of Greater Manchester and Tyne & Wear?

The Conservatives are very good at false unity by the way. There is a reason they're the most enduring political party in any western democracy.


Most cities voted remain  - comfortable majorities for remain in London (as you mentioned), Liverpool, Manchester and Bristol. Other major cities were 50/50, so for example Birmingham had a small leave majority, Newcastle from memory had a small remain majority.

The places I was referring to were towns such as Wigan, West Bromwich, Wakefield etc, they may be technically in metropolitan areas, but no one could describe them as metropolitan. Historically labour areas, but places where UKIP had started to advance, especially in 2015. These types of places were solidly leave in the referendum.
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