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Effects of Brexit
#1
I've seen a couple of reports in the past week that help to understand the enormity and complexity of what we are going to be facing in the next few years.

Firstly, a House of Lords report on agriculture: https://www.parliament.uk/business/commi...t-agr-rpt/ There's a comment in there about problems posed for NI. An example of one of their problems is that of Bailey's Irish Cream Liqueur where the milk of a cow crosses the border with the south FIVE times before ending up in the bottle.

Secondly, Newsnight looked at supply chain issues for manufacturing last night. They visited an engineering company in Bridgnorth that made engine blocks for a French car manufacturer. Their supply chain consisted of moving their product from UK -> Italy -> Germany -> Italy -> Germany -> UK -> France. The company are worried about the impact of tariffs on their costs and added paperwork to the overall time it takes to make their product which they claim even a delay of a few hours is critical.

Both served as a reminder of the challenges the government face in the next 2 years. Before anyone pipes up, I also recognise that these challenges could also provide great opportunities - in particular the chance to finally invest in the training of our young people with skills that removes the need to have EU countries in the supply chain.
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#2
(05-09-2017, 10:11 AM)chasetownbaggie Wrote: I've seen a couple of reports in the past week that help to understand the enormity and complexity of what we are going to be facing in the next few years.

Firstly, a House of Lords report on agriculture: https://www.parliament.uk/business/commi...t-agr-rpt/ There's a comment in there about problems posed for NI. An example of one of their problems is that of Bailey's Irish Cream Liqueur where the milk of a cow crosses the border with the south FIVE times before ending up in the bottle.

Secondly, Newsnight looked at supply chain issues for manufacturing last night. They visited an engineering company in Bridgnorth that made engine blocks for a French car manufacturer. Their supply chain consisted of moving their product from UK -> Italy -> Germany -> Italy -> Germany -> UK -> France. The company are worried about the impact of tariffs on their costs and added paperwork to the overall time it takes to make their product which they claim even a delay of a few hours is critical.

Both served as a reminder of the challenges the government face in the next 2 years. Before anyone pipes up, I also recognise that these challenges could also provide great opportunities - in particular the chance to finally invest in the training of our young people with skills that removes the need to have EU countries in the supply chain.

I'd worry less about tariffs and more about the fuggin supply chain model. Safety blankets like the EU cater extremely well for inefficiencies.
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#3
(05-09-2017, 11:26 AM)Fido Wrote:
(05-09-2017, 10:11 AM)chasetownbaggie Wrote: I've seen a couple of reports in the past week that help to understand the enormity and complexity of what we are going to be facing in the next few years.

Firstly, a House of Lords report on agriculture: https://www.parliament.uk/business/commi...t-agr-rpt/ There's a comment in there about problems posed for NI. An example of one of their problems is that of Bailey's Irish Cream Liqueur where the milk of a cow crosses the border with the south FIVE times before ending up in the bottle.

Secondly, Newsnight looked at supply chain issues for manufacturing last night. They visited an engineering company in Bridgnorth that made engine blocks for a French car manufacturer. Their supply chain consisted of moving their product from UK -> Italy -> Germany -> Italy -> Germany -> UK -> France. The company are worried about the impact of tariffs on their costs and added paperwork to the overall time it takes to make their product which they claim even a delay of a few hours is critical.

Both served as a reminder of the challenges the government face in the next 2 years. Before anyone pipes up, I also recognise that these challenges could also provide great opportunities - in particular the chance to finally invest in the training of our young people with skills that removes the need to have EU countries in the supply chain.

I'd worry less about tariffs and more about the fuggin supply chain model. Safety blankets like the EU cater extremely well for inefficiencies.

I must admit, having never worked in manufacturing, I was quite astonished by these 2 cases. I had no idea this sort of thing happened. As I said, hopefully Brexit will generate new opportunities. Maybe it will allow British industry a little introspection and identify inefficiencies within its processes. Without wishing to sound too dramatic, maybe Brexit is the shock to the system that Britain needs and it can respond much like Germany and Japan did to their defeats after WWII.

Blimey, hark at me, a Remainer, almost sounding optimistic.
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#4
It is not just the EU or manufacturing, even in our homes we have products that have been around
the World in the search to save a few quid on some aspect of preparation prior to reaching the shelf 
of the local supermarket. The madness of globalisation and the race to the bottom in terms of cost,
sees cod caught by Scottish trawlers sent to China to be filleted and then returned to Scotland. It is
now a fact that many fish travel more miles dead than alive. Blended scotch whisky shipped to Australia
to be bottled and Scottish prawns are sent to Thailand to be shelled then returned to the UK to be
converted into Scampi products.

We purchase gas valves that we use in our products from the UK supplier in Liverpool. The gas valve
starts its life in Mexico, before being sent to Japan for further work, then shipped over to the USA
for calibration and testing finally being shipped over to Liverpool.
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#5
(05-09-2017, 02:58 PM)Beano16 Wrote: It is not just the EU or manufacturing, even in our homes we have products that have been around
the World in the search to save a few quid on some aspect of preparation prior to reaching the shelf 
of the local supermarket. The madness of globalisation and the race to the bottom in terms of cost,
sees cod caught by Scottish trawlers sent to China to be filleted and then returned to Scotland. It is
now a fact that many fish travel more miles dead than alive. Blended scotch whisky shipped to Australia
to be bottled and Scottish prawns are sent to Thailand to be shelled then returned to the UK to be
converted into Scampi products.

We purchase gas valves that we use in our products from the UK supplier in Liverpool. The gas valve
starts its life in Mexico, before being sent to Japan for further work, then shipped over to the USA
for calibration and testing finally being shipped over to Liverpool.

where they keep eternal flames burning outside the Shankly Gates...
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#6
(05-09-2017, 04:06 PM)Fido Wrote:
(05-09-2017, 02:58 PM)Beano16 Wrote: It is not just the EU or manufacturing, even in our homes we have products that have been around
the World in the search to save a few quid on some aspect of preparation prior to reaching the shelf 
of the local supermarket. The madness of globalisation and the race to the bottom in terms of cost,
sees cod caught by Scottish trawlers sent to China to be filleted and then returned to Scotland. It is
now a fact that many fish travel more miles dead than alive. Blended scotch whisky shipped to Australia
to be bottled and Scottish prawns are sent to Thailand to be shelled then returned to the UK to be
converted into Scampi products.

We purchase gas valves that we use in our products from the UK supplier in Liverpool. The gas valve
starts its life in Mexico, before being sent to Japan for further work, then shipped over to the USA
for calibration and testing finally being shipped over to Liverpool.

where they keep eternal flames burning outside the Shankly Gates...

If Brexit means No blended scotch whiskey its Another reason to leave.....
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#7
(05-09-2017, 10:11 AM)chasetownbaggie Wrote: I've seen a couple of reports in the past week that help to understand the enormity and complexity of what we are going to be facing in the next few years.

Firstly, a House of Lords report on agriculture: https://www.parliament.uk/business/commi...t-agr-rpt/ There's a comment in there about problems posed for NI. An example of one of their problems is that of Bailey's Irish Cream Liqueur where the milk of a cow crosses the border with the south FIVE times before ending up in the bottle.

Secondly, Newsnight looked at supply chain issues for manufacturing last night. They visited an engineering company in Bridgnorth that made engine blocks for a French car manufacturer. Their supply chain consisted of moving their product from UK -> Italy -> Germany -> Italy -> Germany -> UK -> France. The company are worried about the impact of tariffs on their costs and added paperwork to the overall time it takes to make their product which they claim even a delay of a few hours is critical.

Both served as a reminder of the challenges the government face in the next 2 years. Before anyone pipes up, I also recognise that these challenges could also provide great opportunities - in particular the chance to finally invest in the training of our young people with skills that removes the need to have EU countries in the supply chain.

The border agreement with the RoI predates the UK and Irish membership of the EU by 50 years.
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#8
The carbon footprint on these products must be massive.
Maybe the planet would be better off if they weren't shipped around the world 10 times before they reach the end user.
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#9
Fosters isn't even produced in Australia!!!! WTF.
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#10
(05-09-2017, 07:02 PM)WBA_PETE Wrote: Fosters isn't even produced in Australia!!!! WTF.

Rubbish, I've seen the kangaroos produce it straight into the bottles
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