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Gibraltar, Spain and the EU 'veto'
#1
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.
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#2
(04-02-2017, 08:55 AM)Mandown_Pilt Wrote: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.

Fuck it, let's just have a war:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/...s-michael/

(04-02-2017, 10:48 AM)logic1 Wrote:
(04-02-2017, 08:55 AM)Mandown_Pilt Wrote: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.

Fuck it, let's just have a war:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/...s-michael/

Putin will be laughing his cock off.
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#3
I am not convinced you're not a parody. Proth, is that you? Or are you one of the Left-wing posters here, posting so you can later say how easy it was to bait the 'right wingers'?

Spain ONLY has a veto if we leave the EU without a trade deal and the procedure for governing the negotiations are conducted under Art 218.

On that basis, the Spain 'veto' can be seen as something threatened to concentrate the UK's negotiating efforts for a quick conclusion - including any so called 'severance payment' which we 'owe'. Although no-one can work out how or why we owe the EU at all, being net contributors down the years.
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#4
May I suggest a little board piss up in Gibraltar. You can give some of them your remoaner bollocks.
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#5
(04-02-2017, 10:48 AM)logic1 Wrote:
(04-02-2017, 08:55 AM)Mandown_Pilt Wrote: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.

Fuck it, let's just have a war:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/...s-michael/

(04-02-2017, 10:48 AM)logic1 Wrote:
(04-02-2017, 08:55 AM)Mandown_Pilt Wrote: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.

Fuck it, let's just have a war:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/...s-michael/

Putin will be laughing his cock off.

No problem we already have an expeditionary force in situ. 

[Image: 69eb2a4c-c70d-47ce-965e-d76a406975e3.jpg]
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#6
(04-02-2017, 08:55 AM)Mandown_Pilt Wrote: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.

The hours must fly by...
Reply
#7
(04-02-2017, 03:37 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote:
(04-02-2017, 08:55 AM)Mandown_Pilt Wrote: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-39453535

Spain has not got a veto at all.

Firstly, it is a draft document, not a final position adopted by full Council. 

Secondly, a veto means that Spain could prevent any future deal by its objection alone. It can't. The Article 50 exit deal is approved in Council by a qualified majority. Unanimity is not required. So a Spanish refusal to ratify the agreement doesn't prevent its conclusion.

Until/unless the whole Council agrees to impose any such condition in the final deal (also via QMV - so Spain has no exalted position to insist it's included) then it's legally worthless and unenforceable. 

And even then the Council could be challenged in the ECJ by the government because by giving Spain a veto like this the Council has departed from the principle of QMV as enshrined in Treaty, the highest source of EU law. 

Anyone could be forgiven for thinking the EU institutions are shit-stirring. They are genuinely acting like an abusive husband, mixing overtures of dedication (We miss you already) with threats.

The hours must fly by...

Not my fault you're an ignoramus, old boy.
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#8
You do rhyme with the word though.
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#9
(04-02-2017, 04:51 PM)Heath Wrote: You do rhyme with the word though.

What must that make you?
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