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State of the Union
#1
If we end up with a full on hard Brexit (aka an Ulster fry) how likely is it do you think we eventually have a united Ireland? Oh the irony of the DUP supporting Brexit if that happens.
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#2
(02-25-2017, 05:15 AM)Zoltanger Wrote: If we end up with a full on hard Brexit (aka an Ulster fry) how likely is it do you think we eventually have a united Ireland? Oh the irony of the DUP supporting Brexit if that happens.

Well most of NI want to stay in EU. So that makes it interesting given the DUP are completely ignoring the majority in the jurisdiction. 

I'm not sure enough people want unification - on either side of the border. In principle, it's the right thing but NI population will have to look at what benefits them and their families. Who in NI would want to be part of a Republic where there is no NHS or where taxes and the cost of living are higher for example. I suppose the ineptitude and corruption in Irish politics is something NI folk are used to though.

The republic would need an eternal subsidy from UK for NI as its a bottomless pit.

The DUP are the only party in NI who I would describe as vile throwbacks. I see positives in all the others. Some UUP supporters saying they will transfer to SDLP rather than DUP. Says it all really.
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#3
Thanks for that. We'll see if Kenny's request below goes any further. Even the suggestion might add to the border issue hot potato.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/201...rexit-deal
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#4
I can see his theoretical point and that it is sensible to plan ahead. The practicalities are a different question though. I live in the Republic but I wonder if NI has too much going for it (financially) to give up being part of UK.

Besides Enda has never really wanted a United ireland and gives out To Sinn Fein whenever they mention it. He should be gone within 3 weeks and there's talk of another general election here. maybe Enda is just lining himself up a job as an EU ambassador.
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#5
And there is this

https://mobile.twitter.com/REDCResearch

Sinn Fein fastest growing party in Republic and now getting near the established fuck ups.

That makes it interesting
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#6
Wild speculation I know but by 2030/40 the economic differences may not be so great (e.g. boon in Irish finance industry brought on by Brexit) . This combined with demographic changes, the percentage of the population that is catholic is closing in on the protestant population is it not, might hasten a call for a referendum  on the issue.

Some in the United Kingdom of England and Wales may in the future be thinking 'I didn't realize that little cross I made with my indelible marker would do so much'.

I'll put my crystal ball away now before I get accused of scaremongering.
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#7
(02-28-2017, 08:29 AM)Zoltanger Wrote: Wild speculation I know but by 2030/40 the economic differences may not be so great (e.g. boon in Irish finance industry brought on by Brexit) . This combined with demographic changes, the percentage of the population that is catholic is closing in on the protestant population is it not, might hasten a call for a referendum  on the issue.

Some in the United Kingdom of England and Wales may in the future be thinking 'I didn't realize that little cross I made with my indelible marker would do so much'.

I'll put my crystal ball away now before I get accused of scaremongering.

I've been saying for a while that soon there will be just an England and Wales union. Ireland and Scotland will go, its just a matter of time. Labours meltdown in Scotland was because they took a unionist position. Scotland just need to shift a few % to YES and Brexit may well give it that boost. Also Nicola can just keep asking and they will say yes eventually.

A United Ireland is inevitable as you suggest - but if I was living in NI & was a catholic and a nationalist, I'm not going to vote for private health insurance, double my food bills, triple my car insurance, no lower income tax threshold etc. I am sure that all these things could be sorted but who would pick up the bill. Then you've still got to deal with any throwback loyalist loons who cant deal with the new reality! As well as the people in the Republic who cant bear the thought of assimilating marchers and flag wavers from either side
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#8
People don't always vote with their wallets when they perceive there to be important sovereignty issues at stake do they?

It would be interesting to hear the views of any supporters of the Conservative and Unionist Party.
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#9
(02-28-2017, 08:41 PM)Zoltanger Wrote: People don't always vote with their wallets when they perceive there to be important sovereignty issues at stake do they?

It would be interesting to hear the views of any supporters of the Conservative and Unionist Party.

Well it's kinda " Would you prefer to be shafted by Fine Gael/Fianna Fail or the Tories." One will shaft you with a Tricolour in their hands, the other with the Union Jack. Some choice. A lot of of unionists would prefer to be robbed by the UDP rather than having nationalists in charge. Again, says it all really.
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#10
A brief snippet from the Tory manifesto.

"England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – ours is the greatest union of nations the world has ever seen. Together we have done so much, and we can do much more. The Conservative Party is the party of the Union – and we will always do our utmost to keep our family of nations together."

Really?
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