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Career Advice
#11
(10-07-2018, 08:48 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote: You must always maintain and develop your skills. Keep relevant. Especially in technology. Employers will always find training for you, but you must remember that it’s your responsibility and your money when it comes to that part. I was a freelancer for about 8 years but was slowly drifting out of key technologies as skills were superseded. It took a move back to perm eventually to rekindle that. I should have kept on top of things myself.

My employer doesn't train me, he does to his credit allow me to learn stuff I need to on the job, but I'm pretty much the only person on site who knows ANYTHING about it, but I do far more than he'd ever get without paying a lot of money, and no way he could pay it to be honest. 

I started in the company on the manufacturing side, they were looking to make mobile apps and such, their website designer couldn't. I managed to convince them to let me do it, website designer got in a huff and left(I knew more than her, and she loved being the knowledgeable one about computers.) So I've ended up doing it all. First project was into beta stage 3 months early and has been a resounding success, and I'd never done anything like it before, I just learn quick thankfully with this stuff. Always been a back end, data sort of person, now acquired front end skills.
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#12
(10-07-2018, 08:54 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 08:48 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote: You must always maintain and develop your skills. Keep relevant. Especially in technology. Employers will always find training for you, but you must remember that it’s your responsibility and your money when it comes to that part. I was a freelancer for about 8 years but was slowly drifting out of key technologies as skills were superseded. It took a move back to perm eventually to rekindle that. I should have kept on top of things myself.

My employer doesn't train me, he does to his credit allow me to learn stuff I need to on the job, but I'm pretty much the only person on site who knows ANYTHING about it, but I do far more than he'd ever get without paying a lot of money, and no way he could pay it to be honest. 

I started in the company on the manufacturing side, they were looking to make mobile apps and such, their website designer couldn't. I managed to convince them to let me do it, website designer got in a huff and left(I knew more than her, and she loved being the knowledgeable one about computers.) So I've ended up doing it all. First project was into beta stage 3 months early and has been a resounding success, and I'd never done anything like it before, I just learn quick thankfully with this stuff. Always been a back end, data sort of person, now acquired front end skills.

Gartner say that native development skills are starting to supersede framework development tools again. One to keep an eye on. Much easier to reuse your languages than go down the route of a framework like angular or suchlike.
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#13
I can do framework and native generally. Last project was first time I'd used Angular since it would be too complex in native Javascript or PHP in the time I had, maybe not in hindsight but I was being realistic knowing I had some ways to go learning wise, I could build a database, and the API, and the background class structure, until last month or two, not great front end, now got that under my belt.
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#14
(10-07-2018, 09:00 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote: I can do framework and native generally. Last project was first time I'd used Angular since it would be too complex in native Javascript or PHP in the time I had, maybe not in hindsight but I was being realistic knowing I had some ways to go learning wise, I could build a database, and the API, and the background class structure, until last month or two, not great front end, now got that under my belt.

Go API route. Build your backend style functions and native swift and kotlin are now thought better than angular react etc. Depends on the requirements though obviously. Leverage server less functions in the cloud for speed and cheapness!
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#15
(10-07-2018, 09:02 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 09:00 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote: I can do framework and native generally. Last project was first time I'd used Angular since it would be too complex in native Javascript or PHP in the time I had, maybe not in hindsight but I was being realistic knowing I had some ways to go learning wise, I could build a database, and the API, and the background class structure, until last month or two, not great front end, now got that under my belt.

Go API route. Build your backend style functions and native swift and kotlin are now thought better than angular react etc. Depends on the requirements though obviously. Leverage server less functions in the cloud for speed and cheapness!

I tend to do mobile apps in Xamarin, means some native coding but a lot of shared, simply due to being on my own with short deadlines. Can write in Android native though, not done a complete Swift app, but done bits, so can pick it up no doubt. 

I got strangely good at API's at Uni, I ended up teaching other students how to do them when we had a project requiring one and we were told to research and learn ourselves, I just 'got them'. Many don't seem able to.
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#16
I worked for others for 40 years . Have been retired/freelance for the last 2 years, had no work for 18 months, lost all my savingas and was stressed, depressed and on the verge of a complete breakdown.
Just when I needed it most,something came along, a dream opportunity to show I can still make a difference and leave a legacy behind with a major lifestyle brand. If I believed in a higher power I would say it was providence.
But if I had the choice I would always choose stability and try and do something on the side if possible, working for yourself needs massive discipline and a backstop moneypot, if you have neither stay where you are.
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#17
(10-07-2018, 08:44 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 08:37 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 08:24 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote: I need some genuine advice. I'm very, very underpaid for what I do. However I enjoy doing what I do and working for the company I work for and the projects I have are very interesting. I'm a Web developer, Software developer and Mobile App developer all rolled into one. I currently work for a company involved in a hobby of mine (Tabletop war gaming btw) and therefore I do enjoy the stuff I make.


However I do have a young family and need more money, simple fact, and though my boss is happy to give me a pay rise, I know it won't be a lot, and nowhere near average for what I do.

Therefore it may well be beneficial to go freelance and I am 99% certain my current employer will be happy to be my first customer, and that will pay enough to keep me going for a few months as I build the business up.

I already have the possibility of cheap office space since I know in myself I can't work from home adequately, it's always been a weakness of mine. Plus it means I can be more flexible with working hours saving on childcare and so on. However it's a big gamble and I really don't know what will be best to do. Anyone go freelance in a similar way? How did it go?

It’s hard graft, insecure, you have the wear a lot of hats, cashflow is king. Clients can be great or very bad, ditch the bad ones ASAP. If you aren’t disciplined then things will fall apart quickly, if you get ill easily really don’t do it and get some payment protection insurance if you aren’t. Life, work balance is no easier. Holidays are difficult to plan.

I need hard graft, without it I get depressed.

I wear a lot of hats anyway, my career so far ensures that.

I get that, my family have always been in business themselves, I'd get my Dad to help with accounts and such to make sure I do what needs to be done.

I certainly get that with clients, and have done it myself when running a small 'on the side' business. 

To keep me disciplined going to rent office space at my mates office, he is a sort of inspiration for me having done this a while ago and now a massive success.

Work Life balance is never easy, more certain things will be easier (as  pointed out, school times etc, fully expect o work 7 days a week at times.)

Holidays? What are they? I spend my current holidays from work studying more stuff to get specialised in anyway.

Then the answer is YES, just go for it.  I'm sure you'll make it work as you've convinced yourself and me! 

All the best mate.
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#18
What's Tabletop war gaming? Sound interesting! 
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#19
(10-08-2018, 05:47 AM)TorontoBaggie Wrote: What's Tabletop war gaming? Sound interesting! 

1942 was amazing
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#20
It's a hard slog. I branched out on my own a couple of years ago. When it'd good, it's a great. When it's bad, it's terrible.

I miss all the corporate help I used to have, and the guarantee of a monthly pay check. My only advice Birdy, is be sure you can generate enough income, and don't take on massively long liabilities such as 5 years on an office etc.
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