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Career Advice
#1
I need some genuine advice. I'm very, very underpaid for what I do. However I enjoy doing what I do and working for the company I work for and the projects I have are very interesting. I'm a Web developer, Software developer and Mobile App developer all rolled into one. I currently work for a company involved in a hobby of mine (Tabletop war gaming btw) and therefore I do enjoy the stuff I make.


However I do have a young family and need more money, simple fact, and though my boss is happy to give me a pay rise, I know it won't be a lot, and nowhere near average for what I do.

Therefore it may well be beneficial to go freelance and I am 99% certain my current employer will be happy to be my first customer, and that will pay enough to keep me going for a few months as I build the business up.

I already have the possibility of cheap office space since I know in myself I can't work from home adequately, it's always been a weakness of mine. Plus it means I can be more flexible with working hours saving on childcare and so on. However it's a big gamble and I really don't know what will be best to do. Anyone go freelance in a similar way? How did it go?
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#2
(10-07-2018, 08:24 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote: I need some genuine advice. I'm very, very underpaid for what I do. However I enjoy doing what I do and working for the company I work for and the projects I have are very interesting. I'm a Web developer, Software developer and Mobile App developer all rolled into one. I currently work for a company involved in a hobby of mine (Tabletop war gaming btw) and therefore I do enjoy the stuff I make.


However I do have a young family and need more money, simple fact, and though my boss is happy to give me a pay rise, I know it won't be a lot, and nowhere near average for what I do.

Therefore it may well be beneficial to go freelance and I am 99% certain my current employer will be happy to be my first customer, and that will pay enough to keep me going for a few months as I build the business up.

I already have the possibility of cheap office space since I know in myself I can't work from home adequately, it's always been a weakness of mine. Plus it means I can be more flexible with working hours saving on childcare and so on. However it's a big gamble and I really don't know what will be best to do. Anyone go freelance in a similar way? How did it go?

It’s hard graft, insecure, you have the wear a lot of hats, cashflow is king. Clients can be great or very bad, ditch the bad ones ASAP. If you aren’t disciplined then things will fall apart quickly, if you get ill easily really don’t do it and get some payment protection insurance if you aren’t. Life, work balance is no easier. Holidays are difficult to plan.
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#3
If you’re laid back and can handle stress easily,do it. If you answer no to those,stick with employment with a company you like and enjoy life!
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#4
(10-07-2018, 08:37 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 08:24 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote: I need some genuine advice. I'm very, very underpaid for what I do. However I enjoy doing what I do and working for the company I work for and the projects I have are very interesting. I'm a Web developer, Software developer and Mobile App developer all rolled into one. I currently work for a company involved in a hobby of mine (Tabletop war gaming btw) and therefore I do enjoy the stuff I make.


However I do have a young family and need more money, simple fact, and though my boss is happy to give me a pay rise, I know it won't be a lot, and nowhere near average for what I do.

Therefore it may well be beneficial to go freelance and I am 99% certain my current employer will be happy to be my first customer, and that will pay enough to keep me going for a few months as I build the business up.

I already have the possibility of cheap office space since I know in myself I can't work from home adequately, it's always been a weakness of mine. Plus it means I can be more flexible with working hours saving on childcare and so on. However it's a big gamble and I really don't know what will be best to do. Anyone go freelance in a similar way? How did it go?

It’s hard graft, insecure, you have the wear a lot of hats, cashflow is king. Clients can be great or very bad, ditch the bad ones ASAP. If you aren’t disciplined then things will fall apart quickly, if you get ill easily really don’t do it and get some payment protection insurance if you aren’t. Life, work balance is no easier. Holidays are difficult to plan.

I need hard graft, without it I get depressed.

I wear a lot of hats anyway, my career so far ensures that.

I get that, my family have always been in business themselves, I'd get my Dad to help with accounts and such to make sure I do what needs to be done.

I certainly get that with clients, and have done it myself when running a small 'on the side' business. 

To keep me disciplined going to rent office space at my mates office, he is a sort of inspiration for me having done this a while ago and now a massive success.

Work Life balance is never easy, more certain things will be easier (as  pointed out, school times etc, fully expect o work 7 days a week at times.)

Holidays? What are they? I spend my current holidays from work studying more stuff to get specialised in anyway.
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#5
(10-07-2018, 08:42 PM)EvansAbove Wrote: If you’re laid back and can handle stress easily,do it. If you answer no to those,stick with employment with a company you like and enjoy life!

I NEED stress, I fall into depression and self pity without it. Give me a lot to achieve in an impossible time however and I find a way.
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#6
A long time ago I went contracting in IT and it definitely pays more - there wasn't the legislation then either that made the tax side more difficult. There was plenty of work around then but not always close to home and you don't know what the future holds in that regard. It has meant working away from home a lot on many occasions but that didn't bother me too much and I got used to it  - it does mean less time with the family though and that may not suit you and your family. I'm no longer in IT and it was mainframe not Web stuff and so I don't know the market for you. The extra money from a couple of decades contracting was good and leaves us comfortable enough despite leaner times now, but as with everything there are lifestyle consequences and you can rarely have your cake and eat it
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#7
You must always maintain and develop your skills. Keep relevant. Especially in technology. Employers will always find training for you, but you must remember that it’s your responsibility and your money when it comes to that part. I was a freelancer for about 8 years but was slowly drifting out of key technologies as skills were superseded. It took a move back to perm eventually to rekindle that. I should have kept on top of things myself.
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#8
(10-07-2018, 08:46 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 08:42 PM)EvansAbove Wrote: If you’re laid back and can handle stress easily,do it. If you answer no to those,stick with employment with a company you like and enjoy life!

I NEED stress, I fall into depression and self pity without it. Give me a lot to achieve in an impossible time however and I find a way.

Please can you get wolves champions of Europe this season and Albion to win the league by Xmas?
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#9
if you feel confident in your skill set, how about trying contracting for a bit? It’s usually better paid and often is quite similar to being employed full time in terms of how you work. If a place has plenty of work, you can also find your initial contract will be renewed or you can could be brought in to work on a specific project.
I went from perm to contract, do more or less the same work but have taken on more responsibility out of choice, I literally trebelled my earnings overnight by converting to contract.
If you have any background in dev ops or development, I see jobs regularly advertised at somewhere between 300 to 500 a day for contractors.
Suppose the only barrier may be location, you may have to be willing to travel / stop away which I do find tough with a young family but on the flip side it does mean I can be selfish with my time in the week to study and get to the gym.

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#10
(10-07-2018, 08:46 PM)Birdman1811 Wrote:
(10-07-2018, 08:42 PM)EvansAbove Wrote: If you’re laid back and can handle stress easily,do it. If you answer no to those,stick with employment with a company you like and enjoy life!

I NEED stress, I fall into depression and self pity without it. Give me a lot to achieve in an impossible time however and I find a way.

There’s your answer! I worked for myself for a while.I loved being my own boss and the benefits that went with it,but in the end I hated chasing customers for payment every month and having to put lots of hours in sometimes to get the work completed and that stress involved.I now work for another company and don’t get the stress but miss the freedom I had. Pros and cons with either.
Good luck to you!
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