Union Jack.
#31
(04-07-2021, 03:52 PM)bradesbaggie Wrote: If you come from immigrant parents you have a very different view of the union jack - the flag of the British Empire. 

Give me the flag of St George any day.

But until Euro 96 when the St George's flag was taken by a load of nouveau, post-92 fans, *that* seen as a banner of extremists.
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#32
(04-08-2021, 01:34 PM)fuzzbox Wrote:
(04-08-2021, 01:25 PM)Squid Wrote: I would like to know which other countries would be really chilled about their flag being burned. I suspect it's a rather short list.

Didn't the 'tourist trap' documentary  do something like this on tv once?

The hotel employees all went missing and left 'evidence' of a staff party with a burnt flag of their guests on the floor.

The Americans were absolutely livid - even afterwards when it was revealed as an experiment. One even asked for the flag back to be buried.
As far as I remember and I could be wrong, the Germans were confused, the Scandinavians started to tidy up and the British just laughed, sidestepped the mess and helped themselves to the beer.

In all seriousness though, there's been history of burning flags since flags were invented. I'm sure governments rise above it when they see it - they're certainly not going to let the flag burners dictate their foreign policy.

As for me, If I know somebody is doing something to get a rise out of me - why would I give them what they want? Resorting to burning a flag shows how little power they have and I'm happy for it to stay that way.

That was a really enjoyable programme (think I've mentioned it before on here) and actually reinforced more national stereotypes than anything else!
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#33
I must say I do like a little Union Flag on my trainers to signify their manufacturing origin in Britain, or other items.

After London 2012 it was amazing how many people abroad (not British) bearing or wearing the flag.
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#34
I have 2 x St George's flags I fly in France and I get a cheer, wave and thumbs up from the locals. Never had a problem. If anyone wants to burn them or any other flag as long as they pay for them carry on.
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#35
I like to have a massive Union Flag / Jack in my front room and ensure on Zoom meetings it’s on full display Wink
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#36
I did like the ones on my sandcastles when I was summering in Rangoon as a wee nipper.
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#37
(04-08-2021, 01:20 PM)Bortolazzi's Barnet Wrote:
(04-08-2021, 11:31 AM)Johnnykayeengland Wrote:
(04-07-2021, 04:47 PM)fuzzbox Wrote:
(04-03-2021, 11:32 AM)wba13 Wrote: I don’t care if there Black,white, pink ,green or yellow. I don’t agree with any racism of any form but for those kids to have burnt and them have our Union Jack taken down is totally wrong. The flag represents everything I am British through and through. Those stupid kids ought to take a history lesson
All immigrants cannot be allowed to forget our history that is what our Union Jack represents.

I'm a child of immigrants and also see myself as 'British through and through'

I'm stuck in the US at the moment, but I usually live between the two. I still regard the Uk as home. It's not perfect - but what home is?

I'm assuming the flag represents different things to different people so I'm not sure you can 'teach' a definitive version of what it means. As for history - there's as many different versions as their are historians.

So anyway, when I see the flag I associate it with what I think of the UK. To me it represents tolerance, idealism and eccentricity.

Living in the US, one of the things that always made me smile was how they use the flag as a political battering ram. I smugly always thought we were better than that - once somebody uses the flag or some other emotional plea to patriotism, I'm always suspicious of their motives.

Personally, I think people can burn the Union Flag as much as they want. It doesn't change what I think and if they think it hurts my national pride - great, keep doing it. I'd rather they waste their time doing that than other things that would actually make a difference.

It also make me proud that my home is tolerant of such immaturity and has 'grown up' and evolved as a nation in a way that the US hasn't.
Well said!
"Patriotism, the last resort of the scoundrel" - Boris Johnson.

That dictum is misued, though, he was having a go at fake patriotism.

He didn't say it. It was Samuel Johnson.
Boris is the scoundrel in question.
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#38
(04-08-2021, 04:04 PM)baggiebloke Wrote: I did like the ones on my sandcastles when I was summering in Rangoon as a wee nipper.

The Royal Standard of the United Kingdom was my preferred flag of choice for piles of sand as I left potholes all over the beach for other holiday makers to step into when I were a lad.
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#39
(04-08-2021, 03:45 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: I like to have a massive Union Flag / Jack in my front room and ensure on Zoom meetings it’s on full display Wink

That's ok 'cause we can't see it due to the MASSIVE chip on your shoulder.
   

(04-08-2021, 01:42 PM)Duffers Wrote: Flags are bullshit.
Why?
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#40
(04-08-2021, 05:12 PM)Johnnykayeengland Wrote:
(04-08-2021, 01:20 PM)Bortolazzi's Barnet Wrote:
(04-08-2021, 11:31 AM)Johnnykayeengland Wrote:
(04-07-2021, 04:47 PM)fuzzbox Wrote:
(04-03-2021, 11:32 AM)wba13 Wrote: I don’t care if there Black,white, pink ,green or yellow. I don’t agree with any racism of any form but for those kids to have burnt and them have our Union Jack taken down is totally wrong. The flag represents everything I am British through and through. Those stupid kids ought to take a history lesson
All immigrants cannot be allowed to forget our history that is what our Union Jack represents.

I'm a child of immigrants and also see myself as 'British through and through'

I'm stuck in the US at the moment, but I usually live between the two. I still regard the Uk as home. It's not perfect - but what home is?

I'm assuming the flag represents different things to different people so I'm not sure you can 'teach' a definitive version of what it means. As for history - there's as many different versions as their are historians.

So anyway, when I see the flag I associate it with what I think of the UK. To me it represents tolerance, idealism and eccentricity.

Living in the US, one of the things that always made me smile was how they use the flag as a political battering ram. I smugly always thought we were better than that - once somebody uses the flag or some other emotional plea to patriotism, I'm always suspicious of their motives.

Personally, I think people can burn the Union Flag as much as they want. It doesn't change what I think and if they think it hurts my national pride - great, keep doing it. I'd rather they waste their time doing that than other things that would actually make a difference.

It also make me proud that my home is tolerant of such immaturity and has 'grown up' and evolved as a nation in a way that the US hasn't.
Well said!
"Patriotism, the last resort of the scoundrel" - Boris Johnson.

That dictum is misued, though, he was having a go at fake patriotism.

He didn't say it. It was Samuel Johnson.
Boris is the scoundrel in question.

Yes, my point is that Samuel Johnson wasn't having a go at patriotism. He was saying that scoundrels resort to it as fakery. He was NOT saying that every patriots is a scoundrel.
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