Corporation tax
#11
(02-25-2021, 06:48 PM)Ossian Wrote: I've been reading some stuff recently about the value of rough shooting land being anything up to three times that of the same land when used for agriculture. Rough shooting in this context was resident wildfowl without any artificial rearing to boost numbers. This got me thinking about the land valuation of prime grouse moor and, while it's difficult to pin down a definitive number, I've regularly seen amounts like £20,000 per acre mentioned for land which would have negligible alternative agricultural use, aside from possibly forestry.

These are estates which have become used to attracting generous CAP subsidies, with primary payments based on acreage. Leaving aside the questionable ethics and practices frequently indulged (in more than one sense of the word) on many of these estates, it would be interesting to see how that particular arm of the landowning community would react to the changed financial circumstances of discontinued subsidies followed by the introduction of land value tax.

Actually 'interesting' is an understatement.

What we need is for all the tax law we have to be written on 1 piece of A4 standard lined paper! Making the law and rules transparent to everyone with a grade C at GCSE maths. Then EVERYONE can be held accountable for what they should pay. I'm sure we would all be so much better off and could arguably have a much better funded and run country, benefiting all.
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#12
FenlandBoing Wrote:
Ossian Wrote:I've been reading some stuff recently about the value of rough shooting land being anything up to three times that of the same land when used for agriculture. Rough shooting in this context was resident wildfowl without any artificial rearing to boost numbers. This got me thinking about the land valuation of prime grouse moor and, while it's difficult to pin down a definitive number, I've regularly seen amounts like £20,000 per acre mentioned for land which would have negligible alternative agricultural use, aside from possibly forestry.

These are estates which have become used to attracting generous CAP subsidies, with primary payments based on acreage. Leaving aside the questionable ethics and practices frequently indulged (in more than one sense of the word) on many of these estates, it would be interesting to see how that particular arm of the landowning community would react to the changed financial circumstances of discontinued subsidies followed by the introduction of land value tax.

Actually 'interesting' is an understatement.

What we need is for all the tax law we have to be written on 1 piece of A4 standard lined paper! Making the law and rules transparent to everyone with a grade C at GCSE maths. Then EVERYONE can be held accountable for what they should pay. I'm sure we would all be so much better off and could arguably have a much better funded and run country, benefiting all.
Spot on. It seems to me the tweaking and spoodling of minute adjustments is just an accountants/software provider's bunfight. Keep things simple!
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#13
This country is hilarious.

Corbyn, raise corporation tax to 26% "Marxist"
Sunak, raise corporation tax to 25% "saved the country"
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#14
(03-04-2021, 06:06 AM)Ted Maul Wrote: This country is hilarious.

Corbyn, raise corporation tax to 26% "Marxist"
Sunak, raise corporation tax to 25% "saved the country"

Did Mr. Corbyn  have to contemplate the effects of a pandemic?
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#15
(03-04-2021, 10:07 AM)JOK Wrote:
(03-04-2021, 06:06 AM)Ted Maul Wrote: This country is hilarious.

Corbyn, raise corporation tax to 26% "Marxist"
Sunak, raise corporation tax to 25% "saved the country"

Did Mr. Corbyn  have to contemplate the effects of a pandemic?

Is the blatantly obvious question!
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#16
(03-04-2021, 06:06 AM)Ted Maul Wrote: This country is hilarious.

Corbyn, raise corporation tax to 26% "Marxist"
Sunak, raise corporation tax to 25% "saved the country"

I agree. By 2026 tax as a share of GDP will be as high as it was in 1969 - it's as though the foundations for our most succesful post-war economic period have been whitewashed from history.

I'm beginning to wonder what the Tory Party is for these days, and for the first time in my adult life I'm considering drawing a cock on an ballot paper in May.
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#17
(03-04-2021, 10:07 AM)JOK Wrote:
(03-04-2021, 06:06 AM)Ted Maul Wrote: This country is hilarious.

Corbyn, raise corporation tax to 26% "Marxist"
Sunak, raise corporation tax to 25% "saved the country"

Did Mr. Corbyn  have to contemplate the effects of a pandemic?

The fact that we're in a pandemic makes it even more stupid to increase corporation tax
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#18
It feels like a budget of a man with no options, he can't tax land (and I agree with Proth on the points he has raised) because that would upset the tory heartland voters and his paymasters, and he can't directly go after income tax because he will upset all of the newly won 'red wall' voters. He has created a time bomb in my opinion because at a time when the UK is less attractive to global corps because of Brexit he has just taken away one of the small advantages of locating here.

I work for a global company and in our European all employee meeting this morning there was general upbeat news about how we are beating our previous revenue records for the start of the year, the problem is our UK office is below plan for the period which means in comparison to our other european offices we are lagging when normally we lead the way. If Brexit bites, and we are already suffering supply chain issues which is resulting in us winning deals but not being able to deliver, or turning down deals because we can't meet delivery dates, then added to the new reduced ROI to our HQ then the next step is 'cost saving excercises'. Reducing that ROI by taking more in tax won't be great news for us when our neighbours are recovering well.
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#19
Covid - the best way to hide all the dimly lit lowlands that is Brexit. It’s a gift that’ll keep giving over the next four years for the Tories.
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#20
(03-04-2021, 10:29 AM)Protheroe Wrote: I'm beginning to wonder what the Tory Party is for these days, and for the first time in my adult life I'm considering drawing a cock on an ballot paper in May.

No need, mate. There's guaranteed to be at least a couple already there; it'll even tell you their names.
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