Brexit gains.
#21
(01-02-2021, 04:28 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 04:23 PM)The liquidator Wrote: There are a few c@@@s on here will save a few quid.

(01-02-2021, 04:21 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:18 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: no VAT on tampons.

Would have happened 3 years ago had we voted remain. So no, this isn't a gain.

You didn't move on nothing to see  Heart

Care to refute my point?

It's all if's and buts they could promise the world but when it comes to it I doubt if it would be delivered.... Same as the £350 million on a side of a bus anyone who believed that was just plain daft.
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#22
(01-02-2021, 04:37 PM)The liquidator Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 04:28 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 04:23 PM)The liquidator Wrote: There are a few c@@@s on here will save a few quid.

(01-02-2021, 04:21 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:18 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: no VAT on tampons.

Would have happened 3 years ago had we voted remain. So no, this isn't a gain.

You didn't move on nothing to see  Heart

Care to refute my point?

It's all if's and buts they could promise the world but when it comes to it I doubt if it would be delivered.... Same as the £350 million on a side of a bus anyone who believed that was just plain daft.

It was to be removed in 2017 along with the scheduled EU VAT changes as per the UKs request, and was to be accepted as it isn't zero-rated in Ireland and the fact that tampons and pads are very cheap so the risk of smuggling within the EU are nil so therefore it doesn't violate the EU VAT framework. This was then pushed back indefinitely due to the Brexit vote for obvious reasons (no point expending effort in doing it if the UK is leaving the EUs VAT framework) It isn't in any way analogous to the bus.
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#23
(01-02-2021, 03:28 PM)hudds Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:16 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: Duty Free travelling to and from Europe

Marginal benefit in part and actually a loss, really.  Instead of switching to what had been the ROW duty-free allowances, the EU duty-paid rights for non-commercial purchases for cross-border travellers (at lower cost than the UK rates) will be commuted to duty-free but at reduced levels.

There will be a benefit in that the alcohol duty fraud (in beer and some New World Wine brands as "inward diversion fraud") should cease due to cessation of the intra-EU excise system which has a glitch exploited by fraudsters and replaced with border controls for alcohol as a "controlled goods".  I've told HMRC to re-write its relevant manuals/public notices.  Should be a "dividend" for the industry in easing off the onerous excesses imposed by HMRC on legtimate business.

There are loads of these "niche" things.
Hudds, What is likely to happen to duty on red diesel.  Not a farmer, but have a narrowboat on the cut where we generally get a 60/40 split
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#24
(01-02-2021, 06:56 PM)Baggybenny Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:28 PM)hudds Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:16 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: Duty Free travelling to and from Europe

Marginal benefit in part and actually a loss, really.  Instead of switching to what had been the ROW duty-free allowances, the EU duty-paid rights for non-commercial purchases for cross-border travellers (at lower cost than the UK rates) will be commuted to duty-free but at reduced levels.

There will be a benefit in that the alcohol duty fraud (in beer and some New World Wine brands as "inward diversion fraud") should cease due to cessation of the intra-EU excise system which has a glitch exploited by fraudsters and replaced with border controls for alcohol as a "controlled goods".  I've told HMRC to re-write its relevant manuals/public notices.  Should be a "dividend" for the industry in easing off the onerous excesses imposed by HMRC on legtimate business.

There are loads of these "niche" things.
Hudds, What is likely to happen to duty on red diesel.  Not a farmer, but have a narrowboat on the cut where we generally get a 60/40 split

Well, Benny, you may be aware there has been a consultation by HMG on the withdrawing rebated marked gas oil (red diesel) - this is not related to Brexit or the Energy products Directive as a consequence of Brexit.  Linky thingy: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk..._fuels.pdf

Looks like the 60/40 allocation is viewed as a consistent way to deal with private waterway navigation.
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#25
(01-02-2021, 08:59 PM)hudds Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 06:56 PM)Baggybenny Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:28 PM)hudds Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:16 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: Duty Free travelling to and from Europe

Marginal benefit in part and actually a loss, really.  Instead of switching to what had been the ROW duty-free allowances, the EU duty-paid rights for non-commercial purchases for cross-border travellers (at lower cost than the UK rates) will be commuted to duty-free but at reduced levels.

There will be a benefit in that the alcohol duty fraud (in beer and some New World Wine brands as "inward diversion fraud") should cease due to cessation of the intra-EU excise system which has a glitch exploited by fraudsters and replaced with border controls for alcohol as a "controlled goods".  I've told HMRC to re-write its relevant manuals/public notices.  Should be a "dividend" for the industry in easing off the onerous excesses imposed by HMRC on legtimate business.

There are loads of these "niche" things.
Hudds, What is likely to happen to duty on red diesel.  Not a farmer, but have a narrowboat on the cut where we generally get a 60/40 split

Well, Benny, you may be aware there has been a consultation by HMG on the withdrawing rebated marked gas oil (red diesel) - this is not related to Brexit or the Energy products Directive as a consequence of Brexit.  Linky thingy: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk..._fuels.pdf

Looks like the 60/40 allocation is viewed as a consistent way to deal with private waterway navigation.
Thanks Hudds.  Yes I realised there was initially no Brexit connection but nevertheless now we are "out" I was wondering if the attitude towards this might change.
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#26
Fact Check

Fact checking
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#27
The "all passports" queue was shorted than the 'EU Passports" queue at Lyon airport yesterday. Thanks Boris and Nige!

Unfortunately I couldn't bring the whisky or haggis I'd planned to into France because customs restrictions are now much much tighter but I saved 5 minutes in a queue. Which is what its all about at the end of the day eh.
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#28
(01-05-2021, 09:24 AM)ChamonixBaggie Wrote: The "all passports" queue was shorted than the 'EU Passports" queue at Lyon airport yesterday. Thanks Boris and Nige!

Unfortunately I couldn't bring the whisky or haggis I'd planned to into France because customs restrictions are now much much tighter but I saved 5 minutes in a queue. Which is what its all about at the end of the day eh.

You could have brought the whisky in on payment of the French duty.  You (we) have lost the right to the unlimited duty-paid quantity for personal use as a Community Traveller between Member States.
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#29
(01-02-2021, 04:21 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:18 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: no VAT on tampons.

Would have happened 3 years ago had we voted remain. So no, this isn't a gain.

How could it have happened three years ago? That’s not what these stories suggest. And one is from that fount of all that is ‘true’ about The E.U. The Guardian.
 
“The Treasury pledged to scrap the tampon tax in 2016 following the Stop Taxing Periods campaign launched by the student Laura Coryton, but the promise fell by the wayside after the government failed to change EU law.”
An example of the oft cited “could have change things from within” argument.
 
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/mar/11/rishi-sunak-confirms-tampon-tax-will-be-scrapped
 
 “EU law required members to tax tampons and sanitary towels at 5%, treating period products as non-essential.”
“The UK was able to get rid of the tax now because it is no longer subject to European Union rules on sanitary products.”
“VAT rules, which would give countries the right to stop taxing tampons and other period products, but the move has not yet been agreed by all members. The Republic of Ireland has zero VAT on sanitary products as the rate was in place prior to EU legislation imposing the 5% minimum VAT rate on EU members”
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55502252
 
2021 European Union VAT rates
“The EU sets the broad VAT rules through European VAT Directives, and has set the minimum standard VAT rate at 15%.  The 27 member states (plus UK) are otherwise free to set their standard VAT rates.  The EU also permits a maximum of two reduced rates, the lowest of which must be 5% or above. Some countries have variations on this, including a third, reduced VAT rate, which they had in place prior to their accession to the EU.
Member states have now agreed that they will be free to set the reduced rates on most goods and services, including e-books; domestic fuel; clothing; and female hygiene products.”
Not zero rated!
https://www.avalara.com/vatlive/en/vat-rates/european-vat-rates.html
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#30
(01-05-2021, 02:39 PM)JOK Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 04:21 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(01-02-2021, 03:18 PM)FenlandBoing Wrote: no VAT on tampons.

Would have happened 3 years ago had we voted remain. So no, this isn't a gain.

How could it have happened three years ago? That’s not what these stories suggest. And one is from that fount of all that is ‘true’ about The E.U. The Guardian.
 
“The Treasury pledged to scrap the tampon tax in 2016 following the Stop Taxing Periods campaign launched by the student Laura Coryton, but the promise fell by the wayside after the government failed to change EU law.”
An example of the oft cited “could have change things from within” argument.
 
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/mar/11/rishi-sunak-confirms-tampon-tax-will-be-scrapped
 
 “EU law required members to tax tampons and sanitary towels at 5%, treating period products as non-essential.”
“The UK was able to get rid of the tax now because it is no longer subject to European Union rules on sanitary products.”
“VAT rules, which would give countries the right to stop taxing tampons and other period products, but the move has not yet been agreed by all members. The Republic of Ireland has zero VAT on sanitary products as the rate was in place prior to EU legislation imposing the 5% minimum VAT rate on EU members”
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55502252
 
2021 European Union VAT rates
“The EU sets the broad VAT rules through European VAT Directives, and has set the minimum standard VAT rate at 15%.  The 27 member states (plus UK) are otherwise free to set their standard VAT rates.  The EU also permits a maximum of two reduced rates, the lowest of which must be 5% or above. Some countries have variations on this, including a third, reduced VAT rate, which they had in place prior to their accession to the EU.
Member states have now agreed that they will be free to set the reduced rates on most goods and services, including e-books; domestic fuel; clothing; and female hygiene products.”
Not zero rated!
https://www.avalara.com/vatlive/en/vat-rates/european-vat-rates.html

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-35834142

From before the referendum, as I said.

https://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/si...017_en.pdf

The EU VAT revision effective 2017 that the zero-rating of tampons and sanitary pads would have applied to but didn't because we voted leave.

So, as I said, would have happened 3 years ago had we voted remain.
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