These here students
#21
(09-29-2020, 11:29 AM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(09-29-2020, 09:48 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-28-2020, 10:35 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(09-28-2020, 09:35 PM)Protheroe Wrote: Perhaps all those university lecturers smugly thinking they can deliver a degree by pre-recording zoom lectures ought to have their work recorded, and then be fired. The videos can then be shown to future generations of students and tuition fees abolished.

You can thank me later.

This is so dumb I'm pretty sure a load of my brain cells died reading it

Thousands of Open University graduates would beg to differ.

Open University courses and other online degrees still have teaching staff to help students on their courses, they're not just pre-recorded lectures. That's not to mention stuff like technical demonstrations, dissertations/final year projects/theses, research positions alongside teaching duties and you'd need to rehire loads of staff to teach in physical universities once the dust settles.

So, as I said, what you just proposed is moronic.

Not really moronic as other posters have pointed out. Face to face teaching time has been diminishing anyway for the last two decades.

My initial post was a little tongue in cheek, perhaps my subtlety was lost on you (like it often is) for which I can only apologise.

I agree with you completely on Graduate Tax btw. The loans system is moronic, unlike my post.
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#22
my lad is in his first year at liverpool uni and will not have one face to face lecture this term.

there is one live zoom lecture for 2 hours on a monday and the rest are pre recorded.

flat of five and two of them have corona so their having a pretty poor attempt at self isolating within the halls.

we talked to him about deferring for the year but his thought process was that it was possible could be the same next year so may as well have a go this year.

feel really sorry for any students in their final year with gcse, a level, or degree. this must be terrible for them.
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#23
(09-29-2020, 05:45 PM)foreveralbion Wrote: feel really sorry for any students in their final year with gcse, a level, or degree. this must be terrible for them.

Yep. Also feel terribly sorry for recent graduates in training contracts with no ability to learn from senior colleagues via osmosis and observation.

It's an appalling time to be young.
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#24
(09-29-2020, 06:02 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-29-2020, 05:45 PM)foreveralbion Wrote: feel really sorry for any students in their final year with gcse, a level, or degree. this must be terrible for them.

Yep. Also feel terribly sorry for recent graduates in training contracts with no ability to learn from senior colleagues via osmosis and observation.

It's an appalling time to be young.

HELP
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#25
(09-29-2020, 06:02 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-29-2020, 05:45 PM)foreveralbion Wrote: feel really sorry for any students in their final year with gcse, a level, or degree. this must be terrible for them.

Yep. Also feel terribly sorry for recent graduates in training contracts with no ability to learn from senior colleagues via osmosis and observation.

It's an appalling time to be young.

Just to put some context on this:

My Dad - at the age of 18 he was sent up to Durham to complete 6 months of basic training and learn how to drive a tank. He was sent out to the middle east to see out the last years of the war and was demobbed at 22. He then went into an accountancy firm as an article clerk and worked his way through years of studying to become qualified. He set up his own accountancy firm at 30 and carried that on until he was nearly 80. At it's peak he employed about 13 staff.

My Uncle - at the age of 18 he was sent down to Portsmouth and was put of a navy ship spending 4 years completing the Atlantic run escorting merchant ships across the Atlantic and keeping the supply lines open for the country. The casualties were horrific and faced on a daily basis. He was demobbed at 24 and went into a solicitors office where he completed his training and qualified. He went on to set up his own firm, which was still going 20 years ago although he died in 1972.

My Uncle - after spending his youth in the Air Cadets he dreamt of joining the AirForce but at the age of 18 he was sent up to Derbyshire to work as a Bevan boy, he spent 2 years digging coal out of the ground. When the local s returned from the war he was sent home and studied as a draughtsman. He went onto building his own air conditioning business until his retirement. 

Each one of them had their youth wasted either fighting or helping the war effort, each one of them spent the 1st few years out of education in a place they didn't want to be. Each one of them went onto being successful despite their working class family backgrounds and start in life they were given.

Let's bring this forward to the last recession:

My lad qualified as a QS when the last recession hit - the jobs in the construction industry dried up and he couldn't get any role that he had trained for. He took an admin job in a project management team and worked his way up whilst keeping an eye out for QS roles. When they came back online he found that because he wasn't a new graduate he couldn't get into the field he had trained for. He's carried on with the PM roles and is in a solid role, earning a decent salary.

Give over on the ruined generation picture - they will get by, they're not the 1st generation to suffer the unforeseen problems of the world and they'll get their opportunity when things get back to normal next year.
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#26
I hope that a consequence of covid is that as a country we have a closer look at our universities operate.

Do they provide value for money for students ? Or have some become a money generating machine, that's not fit for purpose.
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#27
(09-30-2020, 09:39 AM)Shabby Russian Wrote: I hope that a consequence of covid is that as a country we have a closer look at our universities operate.

Do they provide value for money for students ? Or have some become a money generating machine, that's not fit for purpose.

Spot on.
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#28
(09-30-2020, 09:39 AM)Shabby Russian Wrote: I hope that a consequence of covid is that as a country we have a closer look at our universities operate.

Do they provide value for money for students ? Or have some become a money generating machine, that's not fit for purpose.

I have read, and I am not sure how true it is, that unless you have studied, medicine, law or accountancy then the amount you will earn is, for women 20% and for men 0%, than those who never went to uni.

Personally I have 2 sons. 1 an academic went to uni, studied security and associated law, got his masters and now works in Australia. My youngest, who was basically written off by the school, firstly went into the army for 5 years and while there took a few courses in IT. When he came out he went straight into a job but at a very low level. He then studied on line and gained qualifications paid for by himself, got a better job and increased his salary by about 15k. 

Unfortunately when the lockdown hit he was made redundant as the company he worked for was a large cruise company. He had carried on studying in his own time and gained more qualifications so he immediately got another position with a further 10k rise, has 2 graduates under him and earns more than my eldest.

The cost of his self education was a tiny percentage of what he would have paid for uni.

I believe that about 60% of graduates are in non-graduate jobs or in jobs that have no relation whatsoever to what they studied.
You pays your money and takes your choice
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#29
It's just a jolly up for alot of them and some of them are putting help on their windows ......get a fucking grip .
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#30
(09-30-2020, 10:18 AM)The liquidator Wrote: It's just a jolly up for alot of them and some of them are putting help on their windows ......get a fucking grip .

You may have been whooshed there chap
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