Apparently at the London demo
#11
(09-27-2020, 06:59 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 06:41 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Talking of freedom 

The right kind right kind of education

Sounds perfectly reasonable.

Sounds quite authoritarian to me. Book burning night every Thursday at after schools club.
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#12
(09-27-2020, 11:59 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 07:30 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Libertarians like to impose their freedoms on all those around them. It’s short hand for selfish.

How awful, "imposing freedom". Big Grin

Imposing freedom - that's an oxymoron isn't it?
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#13
(09-27-2020, 07:59 PM)Shabby Russian Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 11:59 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 07:30 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Libertarians like to impose their freedoms on all those around them. It’s short hand for selfish.

How awful, "imposing freedom". Big Grin

Imposing freedom - that's an oxymoron isn't it?

No Shabs, that's just a contradiction in terms.

An oxymoron is rhetorical or literary device to make a point or emphasis by apparent paradox.  I know what it has become due to misunderstanding and ignorance (ie probably not taught at school anymore; I found English language and literature fascinating but it must no longer be teached as wot it ort).  Accordingly, one must accept that the oxymoron has lost its true meaning, which is a shame.

From ye Wiki,  a classic example of the use of oxymorons in English literature can be found in this example from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, where Romeo strings together thirteen in a row:
Quote:O brawling love! O loving hate!
  O anything of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness, serious vanity!
  Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
  Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.[11]

Bostin.  "feather of lead"

Me heart aerks.
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#14
(09-28-2020, 10:21 AM)hudds Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 07:59 PM)Shabby Russian Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 11:59 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 07:30 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Libertarians like to impose their freedoms on all those around them. It’s short hand for selfish.

How awful, "imposing freedom". Big Grin

Imposing freedom - that's an oxymoron isn't it?

No Shabs, that's just a contradiction in terms.

An oxymoron is rhetorical or literary device to make a point or emphasis by apparent paradox.  I know what it has become due to misunderstanding and ignorance (ie probably not taught at school anymore; I found English language and literature fascinating but it must no longer be teached as wot it ort).  Accordingly, one must accept that the oxymoron has lost its true meaning, which is a shame.

From ye Wiki,  a classic example of the use of oxymorons in English literature can be found in this example from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, where Romeo strings together thirteen in a row:
Quote:O brawling love! O loving hate!
  O anything of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness, serious vanity!
  Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
  Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.[11]

Bostin.  "feather of lead"

Me heart aerks.

Does that mean that something like friendly fire (which is often cited as an oxymoron) isn't actually an oxymoron.

You live and learn each day or you should do.
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#15
(09-28-2020, 10:57 AM)Shabby Russian Wrote:
(09-28-2020, 10:21 AM)hudds Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 07:59 PM)Shabby Russian Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 11:59 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-27-2020, 07:30 AM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: Libertarians like to impose their freedoms on all those around them. It’s short hand for selfish.

How awful, "imposing freedom". Big Grin

Imposing freedom - that's an oxymoron isn't it?

No Shabs, that's just a contradiction in terms.

An oxymoron is rhetorical or literary device to make a point or emphasis by apparent paradox.  I know what it has become due to misunderstanding and ignorance (ie probably not taught at school anymore; I found English language and literature fascinating but it must no longer be teached as wot it ort).  Accordingly, one must accept that the oxymoron has lost its true meaning, which is a shame.

From ye Wiki,  a classic example of the use of oxymorons in English literature can be found in this example from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, where Romeo strings together thirteen in a row:
Quote:O brawling love! O loving hate!
  O anything of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness, serious vanity!
  Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
  Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.[11]

Bostin.  "feather of lead"

Me heart aerks.

Does that mean that something like friendly fire (which is often cited as an oxymoron) isn't actually an oxymoron.

You live and learn each day or you should do.
Friendly fire is not a true oxymoron.  It is a euphemisim - a disarming way to say something unpalatable in that case.  An interesting case where such a term wasn't used/invented was Battle of Barking Creek.
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#16
Libertarians chill me to the bone.
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#17
For Libertarians read spoilt kids whose Mommy and Daddy told them they could be whatever they wanted to be and grew up to be arrogant middle aged folk that think they know better than everyone else because they have money / education / an inferiority complex.
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#18
For socialists read children; As soon as children discover the world isn't nice they want to make it nicer.

But kids are broke, so they want to make the world nicer with your money. And they don't have much control over things, so they want to make the world nicer through your effort. Kids would no doubt like to help, but they're busy being kids.

This is the way western children have thought ever since they were invented, which was in about the 19th century. At that time mechanisation liberated them from onerous farm work and child labour laws liberated them from the factory. This gave them the leisure to sit around all day noticing that the world wasn't nice and daydreaming about how it could be nicer. The answer is to make them get up at 4:00 AM and send them out to milk the cows. This should keep them busy as most of them now live many miles from one.
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#19
(09-29-2020, 10:00 AM)Protheroe Wrote: For socialists read children; As soon as children discover the world isn't nice they want to make it nicer.

But kids are broke, so they want to make the world nicer with your money. And they don't have much control over things, so they want to make the world nicer through your effort. Kids would no doubt like to help, but they're busy being kids.

This is the way western children have thought ever since they were invented, which was in about the 19th century. At that time mechanisation liberated them from onerous farm work and child labour laws liberated them from the factory. This gave them the leisure to sit around all day noticing that the world wasn't nice and daydreaming about how it could be nicer. The answer is to make them get up at 4:00 AM and send them out to milk the cows. This should keep them busy as most of them now live many miles from one.

Protheroe in poor wind up attempt when he’s getting a shoeing  Big Grin
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#20
"Freedom is so precious that it must be rationed".

Lenin.

Some times I really sympathise with the sentiment.
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