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Finished my first week back in teaching
#41
(01-13-2018, 10:34 AM)WallofTrewick Wrote: Many thanks for all the supportive comments and good wishes, it means a lot.

Making it through this week was a challenge but I'm really pleased to have done it. Obviously it might still not work out over time as I've still been rather anxious but it has been much better than expected.

I'm in BRE E13 H 100 today if anybody around there wants to come and punch me or say hello!

I’ll bring you a signed photo of Nigel Farage to celebrate your 1st week back Big Grin

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#42
(01-13-2018, 10:41 AM)King Astle Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 10:34 AM)WallofTrewick Wrote: Many thanks for all the supportive comments and good wishes, it means a lot.

Making it through this week was a challenge but I'm really pleased to have done it. Obviously it might still not work out over time as I've still been rather anxious but it has been much better than expected.

I'm in BRE E13 H 100 today if anybody around there wants to come and punch me or say hello!

I’ll bring you a signed photo of Nigel Farage to celebrate your 1st week back Big Grin

Can't you stretch to Gove?  Big Grin
Reply
#43
I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.
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#44
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding jobs you can do. If that's missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

Hi mate. 
I've been out of it for a few months and have now gone 60% part-time to get some work-life balance.

To answer your fair question honestly. When working full time I'm usually working from around 6 to 9/10+ Monday to Thursday night and one day over the weekend for about 6 hours. 
That does vary but is pretty standard for most weeks. The main issues are the time spent on marking with ever increasing class size and in-school policies (many of which are geared up for OFSTED's benefit rather than the kids).
I reckon I do a total of about 2 weeks work in the summer holidays but spend most of the first week just becoming human again!
Other holidays all involve work but I used to try to get away for a few days when possible.
The day itself is draining if you have 5 lessons and no free time as you cannot hide in a corner take a break when in the classroom. There are briefings before school most days and duties at break / lunchtime. It is actually quite physically demanding as well.
As a Science teacher there are extra H & S aspects and you need eyes in the back of your head when doing a class practical. Also you need to plan your lessons a week in advance to order the equipment from technicians for the following week.


It can be a fantastic job. I don't think teachers are whinging because they are lazy but because they can just no longer do all of the tasks expected of them in a reasonable time. 
This is evidenced by the number of older teachers having to leave the profession because they can no longer cope (not because they are shit teachers) and the number of younger ones leaving after just a few years.
Couple this to young, inexperienced managers (the age of some senior teachers now is crazy) in some schools who are empire building and climbing the greasy pole without too much concern for others. Many of these guys are just not personable and do not have the teaching experience to be doing these jobs.....IMHO.

Phew....that was quite cathartic!
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#45
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

During the last summer 'holiday', due to changing the exam board, four teachers in my ex dept. had to produce all new Schemes of Work and lesson plans for each new module. (One each) this does not just mean the lesson presentation but also the resources to hand out and the end of topic assessment paper , including the mark scheme. Not a five minutes job.
Reply
#46
(01-13-2018, 11:05 AM)WallofTrewick Wrote: Hi mate. 
I've bene out of it for a few months and have now gone 60% part-time to get some work-life balance.

To answer your fair question honestly. When working full time I'm usually working from around 6 to 9/10+ Monday to Thursday night and one day over the weekend for about 6 hours. 
That does vary but is pretty standard for most weeks. The main issues are the time spent on marking with ever increasing class size and in-school policies (many of which are geared up for OFSTED's benefit rather than the kids).
I reckon I do a total of about 2 weeks work in the summer holidays but spend most of the first week just becoming human again!
Other holidays all involve work but I used to try to get away for a few days when possible.
The day itself is draining if you have 5 lessons and no free time as you cannot hide in a corner take a break when in the classroom. There are briefings before school most days and duties at break / lunchtime. It is actually quite physically demanding as well.
As a Science teacher there are extra H & S aspects and you need eyes int he back of your head when doing a class practical. Also you need to plan your lessons a week in advance to order the equipment from technicians for the following week.


It can be a fantastic job. I don't think teachers are whinging because they are lazy but because they can just no longer do all of the tasks expected of them in a reasonable time. 
This is evidenced by the number of older teachers having to leave the profession because they can no longer cope (not because they are shit teachers) and the number of younger ones leaving after just a few years.
Couple this to young, inexperienced managers (the age of some senior teachers now is crazy) in some schools who are empire building and climbing the greasy pole without too much concern for others. Many of these guys are just not personable and do not have the teaching experience to be doing these jobs.....IMHO.

Phew....that was quite cathartic!

Thanks for taking the trouble to respond. From what you've said, it seems clear that something has got to change.  For whatever reason, it obviously doesn't seem to be working as it is.

On a side note, Science teacher? Christ I remember our chemistry lessons...30 fourteen year olds burning bic pens with bunsen burners, mixing alkalis with hydrochloric acid and routinely cracking expensive looking lieberg(?) condensers. All whilst wearing a pinny made out of a bedsheet!

Now THAT I wouldn't do if I didn't get a H&S waiver....
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#47
(01-13-2018, 11:18 AM)John Osbourne Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

During the last summer 'holiday', due to changing the exam board, four teachers in my ex dept. had to produce all new Schemes of Work and lesson plans for each new module. (One each) this does not just mean the lesson presentation but also the resources to hand out and the end of topic assessment paper , including the mark scheme. Not a five minutes job.

Absolutely. I was a Head of a large department in Singapore and we changed the whole curriculum under my leadership. This wasn't my idea but was, to be fair, a change for the better. I had to produce some schemes and load onto on-line platforms as an example to the rest of the department of what was expected. I then ended up doing the lions share of the remaining schemes. 
That summer I was back in the UK but stuck behind a computer for a good chunk of it.
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#48
(01-13-2018, 11:26 AM)UThe WallofTrewick Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 11:18 AM)John Osbourne Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

During the last summer 'holiday', due to changing the exam board, four teachers in my ex dept. had to produce all new Schemes of Work and lesson plans for each new module. (One each) this does not just mean the lesson presentation but also the resources to hand out and the end of topic assessment paper , including the mark scheme. Not a five minutes job.

Absolutely. I was a Head of a large department in Singapore and we changed the whole curriculum under my leadership. This wasn't my idea but was, to be fair, a change for the better. I had to produce some schemes and load onto on-line platforms as an example to the rest of the department of what was expected. I then ended up doing the lions share of the remaining schemes. 
That summer I was back in the UK but stuck behind a computer for a good chunk of it.
Were you able to leave the differentiation to the individual teachers or, as it was in Singapore, was it a 'posh' school and no differentiation was needed? ( I suspect that those that role out the old teachers have a cushy number argument do not realise that one lesson can actually mean producing two or three lesson plans)
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#49
(01-13-2018, 11:37 AM)John Osbourne Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 11:26 AM)UThe WallofTrewick Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 11:18 AM)John Osbourne Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

During the last summer 'holiday', due to changing the exam board, four teachers in my ex dept. had to produce all new Schemes of Work and lesson plans for each new module. (One each) this does not just mean the lesson presentation but also the resources to hand out and the end of topic assessment paper , including the mark scheme. Not a five minutes job.

Absolutely. I was a Head of a large department in Singapore and we changed the whole curriculum under my leadership. This wasn't my idea but was, to be fair, a change for the better. I had to produce some schemes and load onto on-line platforms as an example to the rest of the department of what was expected. I then ended up doing the lions share of the remaining schemes. 
That summer I was back in the UK but stuck behind a computer for a good chunk of it.
Were you able to leave the differentiation to the individual teachers or, as it was in Singapore, was it a 'posh' school and no differentiation was needed? ( I suspect that those that role out the old teachers have a cushy number argument do not realise that one lesson can actually mean producing two or three lesson plans)

No, we had to build in differentiated tasks and assessment for learning opportunities into the lessons. 

It was a 'posh' school for the kids of ex-pats (generally finance and trading types) in Singapore but you wouldn't believe how low ability some were! Many of these rich guys (not being sexist but it was usually the guy with trailing spouse) liked a trophy wife. Brains were not at the top of the list of credentials these guys were basing their selection on. There is clearly a major genetic influence on intelligence  Big Grin
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#50
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

I take your point about remembering bad teachers but I also remember having some really good ones, one especially stands out from when I was about 9. She was strict, wouldn’t be allowed to say half of what she did nowadays but looking back she was passionate about giving us a good start in life and really committed to her class. I think it was her who sparked my interest in current affairs and an appreciation of the value of knowing stuff. 
I’m a firm believer that a good teacher can really change a kids life and future and that’s something that cannot be over valued

(01-13-2018, 11:48 AM)WallofTrewick Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 11:37 AM)John Osbourne Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 11:26 AM)UThe WallofTrewick Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 11:18 AM)John Osbourne Wrote:
(01-13-2018, 10:51 AM)fuzzbox Wrote: I think the problem is we all remember really shit teachers that weren't worth half of what they got paid. As usual, the 'merely' competent don't provoke the same emotion or memories.

A genuine question - I can understand having to work 'til 10.30pm at night (not saying it's fair or right, although teaching isn't the only profession where this happens) during the term times, but is that still the case during the 'holidays'? What sort of hours do you have to work then?

Btw, I don't think being a teacher is an easy touch, but neither do I think it's the hardest. I would imagine, in the right school (if it exists) with the right support and the right attitude it must be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable jobs you can do. If any of those factors are missing, it must be awful. 

But then a lot of us could say that about our jobs.

During the last summer 'holiday', due to changing the exam board, four teachers in my ex dept. had to produce all new Schemes of Work and lesson plans for each new module. (One each) this does not just mean the lesson presentation but also the resources to hand out and the end of topic assessment paper , including the mark scheme. Not a five minutes job.

Absolutely. I was a Head of a large department in Singapore and we changed the whole curriculum under my leadership. This wasn't my idea but was, to be fair, a change for the better. I had to produce some schemes and load onto on-line platforms as an example to the rest of the department of what was expected. I then ended up doing the lions share of the remaining schemes. 
That summer I was back in the UK but stuck behind a computer for a good chunk of it.
Were you able to leave the differentiation to the individual teachers or, as it was in Singapore, was it a 'posh' school and no differentiation was needed? ( I suspect that those that role out the old teachers have a cushy number argument do not realise that one lesson can actually mean producing two or three lesson plans)

No, we had to build in differentiated tasks and assessment for learning opportunities into the lessons. 

It was a 'posh' school for the kids of ex-pats (generally finance and trading types) in Singapore but you wouldn't believe how low ability some were! Many of these rich guys (not being sexist but it was usually the guy with trailing spouse) liked a trophy wife. Brains were not at the top of the list of credentials these guys were basing their selection on. There is clearly a major genetic influence on intelligence  Big Grin
Do you put much store on “intelligence” or talent? Personally I think it’s very overrated and find it’s the willingness to learn and work hard that counts for more.

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