Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Who'd want to be a young bloke on the pull these days?
#71
(01-12-2018, 01:19 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote: i think the only men in a state of bewilderment and confusion at the moment are the misogynistic ones.  look, but don't overdo it.  commonplace antics in the past that aren't now, arent' necessarily changes of viewpoints from either side.  it shouldn't have happened then and isn't now.

What's the point in pigeonholing? Nothing could be further from the truth. I'm happily engaged to the same person that I've been with for 5 years and even prior to then have never been one to "go out on the pull". I'm also self employed so "office banter" isn't an issue in my life. DK also doesn't particularly strike me as a misogynist.

As pointed out in MOST cases not much has changed. However, there is a rising minority of people who will take offence to things that, in most peoples eyes, are not malicious, dangerous and that the majority would find completely fine. I'm not talking about groping a breast or trying to make out with someone involuntarily. I'm talking about innocent conversations that, if a woman initiated a guy, it would be completely ok.

Also while we're all trying to score virtue points for being against things that are demonstrably horrific such as involuntarily groping I'd just like to say that I find it completely unacceptable for a guy to whip his dick out and slap it in an unsuspecting woman's face. What a brave position to hold. I'm a good person
Reply
#72
(01-12-2018, 01:19 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote: i think the only men in a state of bewilderment and confusion at the moment are the misogynistic ones.  look, but don't overdo it.  commonplace antics in the past that aren't now, arent' necessarily changes of viewpoints from either side.  it shouldn't have happened then and isn't now.

A decent addition this view to the thread, and it must be complex for blokes from an entirely male background. EG I've a brother-in-law who has only ever worked on the buildings and he is utterly like a fish out of water around women. 
I agree that forcing yourself on a woman, even a kiss, when it's not on the agenda is a no go. I suppose working in mixed sex environments help us all work out the game.
Yet whilst I agree misogynists won't get it at all, there is a tendency to be the victim for very mild reasons by some now. A joke, innuendo, etc can now land people in trouble even when it's deemed by most to be innocuous. We have a whole generation of people ready to take offence. People sometimes should be told to stop being so sensitive and just get on with life.
Reply
#73
(01-12-2018, 01:13 PM)HLS Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 07:18 AM)Choronzonbaggie Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 02:20 AM)HLS Wrote: I was in a bar with a few people who I've not known long. We are leaving and one of the girls gets to the door, me behind her. She starts to open the door but then she realises I'm behind her and she lets it go. She looks at me. I say, are we leaving thinking she might be waiting for others but just stares at me blankly. I open the door because I want a cigarette. It's at that point she elects to leave. I say why didn't you just go through, you were already opening it. "I was just giving you the chance to be a gentleman." 

Fuck off.

Was she ugly?

She's a princess.

Should have given her the link to this place then, she'd have fit right in with a few on here.
Reply
#74
Birds - They love it eh? Cool
Reply
#75
Me!! Undecided
Reply
#76
(01-12-2018, 11:35 AM)Malcolm Tucker Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 10:17 PM)SophieX Wrote: Just for clarity: grabbing a girl's tit during an uninvited kiss is sexual assault. Just in case anyone a) thought it was ok b) they don't fancy signing a register.

IMO, the bit about getting scowled at for opening doors is plain bollocks - I do it daily, almost as chivelrously as FF would, and never get a dirty look.  People are wilfully conflating different parts on sometimes different, sometimes the same scale.

That scale goes from grey to black (but doesn't include holding a door open for someone unless you're looking down their top) and, whilst I have sympathy with the downtrodden men who can't suppress their libido in the workplace, nobody is seriously suggesting flirtation should be banned.  They're just saying you're fucking rubbish at it/a borderline sex case.

Arf! Bang on
Is roysh

I'm 60 this year and how one treats and responds to women hasn't fundamentally changed.  Spandau often whines about "political correctness" but it's not hard to see what constitutes fundamental appropriate, correct behaviour.  And for the record, I try to be pleasant to all and smile, open doors and show consideration to the opposite sex.  It may even be considered mildly flirtatious; whatever,  I have never had any negative responses and if I did, I wouldn't hold that against every other woman who has been friendly about my courtesies. 

Load ov bolloCks
Reply
#77
(01-12-2018, 01:35 PM)spandaubaggie Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 01:19 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote: i think the only men in a state of bewilderment and confusion at the moment are the misogynistic ones.  look, but don't overdo it.  commonplace antics in the past that aren't now, arent' necessarily changes of viewpoints from either side.  it shouldn't have happened then and isn't now.

A decent addition this view to the thread, and it must be complex for blokes from an entirely male background. EG I've a brother-in-law who has only ever worked on the buildings and he is utterly like a fish out of water around women. 
I agree that forcing yourself on a woman, even a kiss, when it's not on the agenda is a no go. I suppose working in mixed sex environments help us all work out the game.
Yet whilst I agree misogynists won't get it at all, there is a tendency to be the victim for very mild reasons by some now. A joke, innuendo, etc can now land people in trouble even when it's deemed by most to be innocuous. We have a whole generation of people ready to take offence. People sometimes should be told to stop being so sensitive and just get on with life.
as much as i hate the phrase there is a bit of a snowflake generation now. Personally i feel it stems from a sense of entitlement and the feeling nothing should ever go wrong or make people uncomfortable. Its not just with regards to gender, you see it about a multitude of things now. 
I'm certainly not advocating a return to the open racism and sexism of the 1970's but as Salman Rushdie said, no one has the right to not be offended.

Reply
#78
(01-12-2018, 03:50 PM)King Astle Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 01:35 PM)spandaubaggie Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 01:19 PM)Pipes Of Peace Wrote: i think the only men in a state of bewilderment and confusion at the moment are the misogynistic ones.  look, but don't overdo it.  commonplace antics in the past that aren't now, arent' necessarily changes of viewpoints from either side.  it shouldn't have happened then and isn't now.

A decent addition this view to the thread, and it must be complex for blokes from an entirely male background. EG I've a brother-in-law who has only ever worked on the buildings and he is utterly like a fish out of water around women. 
I agree that forcing yourself on a woman, even a kiss, when it's not on the agenda is a no go. I suppose working in mixed sex environments help us all work out the game.
Yet whilst I agree misogynists won't get it at all, there is a tendency to be the victim for very mild reasons by some now. A joke, innuendo, etc can now land people in trouble even when it's deemed by most to be innocuous. We have a whole generation of people ready to take offence. People sometimes should be told to stop being so sensitive and just get on with life.
as much as i hate the phrase there is a bit of a snowflake generation now. Personally i feel it stems from a sense of entitlement and the feeling nothing should ever go wrong or make people uncomfortable. Its not just with regards to gender, you see it about a multitude of things now. 
I'm certainly not advocating a return to the open racism and sexism of the 1970's but as Salman Rushdie said, no one has the right to not be offended.
True. I hate the Daily Mail, but find myself in broad agreement with a lot of this article written by a woman.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/articl...chman.html
Reply
#79
(01-12-2018, 03:49 PM)Grrrr Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 11:35 AM)Malcolm Tucker Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 10:17 PM)SophieX Wrote: Just for clarity: grabbing a girl's tit during an uninvited kiss is sexual assault. Just in case anyone a) thought it was ok b) they don't fancy signing a register.

IMO, the bit about getting scowled at for opening doors is plain bollocks - I do it daily, almost as chivelrously as FF would, and never get a dirty look.  People are wilfully conflating different parts on sometimes different, sometimes the same scale.

That scale goes from grey to black (but doesn't include holding a door open for someone unless you're looking down their top) and, whilst I have sympathy with the downtrodden men who can't suppress their libido in the workplace, nobody is seriously suggesting flirtation should be banned.  They're just saying you're fucking rubbish at it/a borderline sex case.

Arf! Bang on
Is roysh

I'm 60 this year and how one treats and responds to women hasn't fundamentally changed.  Spandau often whines about "political correctness" but it's not hard to see what constitutes fundamental appropriate, correct behaviour.  And for the record, I try to be pleasant to all and smile, open doors and show consideration to the opposite sex.  It may even be considered mildly flirtatious; whatever,  I have never had any negative responses and if I did, I wouldn't hold that against every other woman who has been friendly about my courtesies. 

Load ov bolloCks

Nailed it Hudds
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)