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Tony Pulis' honest assessment of why West Brom haven't been winning games
#51
(11-15-2017, 05:49 PM)Dumbo Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 05:38 PM)spyro 123 Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 04:44 PM)Dumbo Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 02:57 PM)spyro 123 Wrote: palace played boring football under pulis

No they never.

yes they did

No, they never.

[Image: going-around-in-circles.png]
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#52
Pulls himself commented (that at Palace), he had loads of attacking options. In 3 years here he has shown no intention of ever buying or playing similarly.
Re the OP. We could have had more points possibly, but I'm not sure we did enough to deserve them.
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#53
(11-15-2017, 08:16 PM)swordfish Wrote: Pulls himself commented (that at Palace), he had loads of attacking options. In 3 years here he has shown no intention of ever buying or playing similarly.
Re the OP. We could have had more points possibly, but I'm not sure we did enough to deserve them.

I imagine if he' stayed longer than the 6 months or so he did at Palace he'd have turned them into a right boring side too.
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#54
(11-15-2017, 08:16 PM)swordfish Wrote: Pulls himself commented (that at Palace), he had loads of attacking options. In 3 years here he has shown no intention of ever buying or playing similarly.
Re the OP. We could have had more points possibly, but I'm not sure we did enough to deserve them.

His achievement at Palace was to realise that he'd been bequeathed a team of ill disciplined but quick breaking players who just needed to be given some defensive solidity. 

He knew he could start to rebuild the team in his own image the following season. His parting gift to them was Brede Hangeland.

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#55
(11-15-2017, 08:38 PM)Dreamkiller Wrote: His achievement at Palace was to realise that he'd been bequeathed a team of ill disciplined but quick breaking players who just needed to be given some defensive solidity. 

He knew he could start to rebuild the team in his own image the following season. His parting gift to them was Brede Hangeland.

I agree with that: I think he inherited a fait accompli at Palace, had the opportunity to make a couple of changes in personnel and was thereafter stuck with what he had. 

He probably saw playing fast, counter-attacking football as making the best of a bad job, but not something he'd choose to do. Perhaps he hated it so much (or himself for succumbing to it) he just couldn't wait to get out; not even for one extra day.
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#56
To use Palace as an example of Pulis playing style can't be right. It's an outlier. His other 90% of games have always fitted the same pattern. It wouldn't surprise me if he went all gung ho against Chelsea to see us lose 4 0 and tell everyone why his method is the only kind that works
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#57
(11-15-2017, 09:07 PM)Ossian Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 08:38 PM)Dreamkiller Wrote: His achievement at Palace was to realise that he'd been bequeathed a team of ill disciplined but quick breaking players who just needed to be given some defensive solidity. 

He knew he could start to rebuild the team in his own image the following season. His parting gift to them was Brede Hangeland.

I agree with that: I think he inherited a fait accompli at Palace, had the opportunity to make a couple of changes in personnel and was thereafter stuck with what he had. 

He probably saw playing fast, counter-attacking football as making the best of a bad job, but not something he'd choose to do. Perhaps he hated it so much (or himself for succumbing to it) he just couldn't wait to get out; not even for one extra day.

The thought that he'd rather take the 'wack it up to the big lad' route over having a team of fast-paced nimble forwards who can break at pace is something I find a bit strange. It's definitely his preferred tactic though. Almost like he'd rather limit his chance of real success. 

Many Stoke fans have long been convinced that this was the case with Pulis.

(11-15-2017, 09:16 PM)billybassett Wrote: To use Palace as an example of Pulis playing style can't be right. It's an outlier. His other 90% of games have always fitted the same pattern. It wouldn't surprise me if he went all gung ho against Chelsea to see us lose 4 0 and tell everyone why his method is the only kind that works

He's done that many a time in the past both with Stoke and West Brom. It's too late for him to do it now.

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#58
(11-15-2017, 09:16 PM)billybassett Wrote: To use Palace as an example of Pulis playing style can't be right. It's an outlier. His other 90% of games have always fitted the same pattern. It wouldn't surprise me if he went all gung ho against Chelsea to see us lose 4 0 and tell everyone why his method is the only kind that works

Just imagine if he did that and we won 4-0......
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#59
(11-15-2017, 09:28 PM)swordfish Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 09:16 PM)billybassett Wrote: To use Palace as an example of Pulis playing style can't be right. It's an outlier. His other 90% of games have always fitted the same pattern. It wouldn't surprise me if he went all gung ho against Chelsea to see us lose 4 0 and tell everyone why his method is the only kind that works

Just imagine if he did that and we won 4-0......

A win win yes
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#60
I've said it before and I'll say it again. I agree that we haven't had the rub of the green in some games which has cost us a few points but at the same time we aren't positive enough to get any luck attacking wise. If you sit back and sit back you will eventually have something go against you where the opposition capitalise.

We don't see enough of the ball, no argument. When we do see the ball we make poor passes or the wrong pass, no argument. This isn't how the players want to play and only comes from one man. I hope he has a real good think about who he's playing and where as this quite clearly going to cost him his job sooner rather than later.
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