UK Covid death toll
(03-30-2021, 03:17 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(03-30-2021, 02:34 PM)Ossian Wrote: '75 was a hot one as well; exceptional by normal standards then eclipsed by '76.

Normal standards? 1976 has been matched 3 times in the 21st century, the last time in 2018, so I'm not sure it's exceptional anymore.

I've not looked it up, but although temperatures might have been surpassed, I'm pretty sure we went about 2-3 months without any rain or very little, so not sure that has been matched.
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I think you've got to take into account the times as well, there weren't any air conditioned offices or restaurants for us to enjoy and the water was rationed because the infrastructure was so bad as well.
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(03-30-2021, 03:33 PM)tiptontown Wrote:
(03-30-2021, 03:17 PM)Borin' Baggie Wrote:
(03-30-2021, 02:34 PM)Ossian Wrote: '75 was a hot one as well; exceptional by normal standards then eclipsed by '76.

Normal standards? 1976 has been matched 3 times in the 21st century, the last time in 2018, so I'm not sure it's exceptional anymore.

I've not looked it up, but although temperatures might have been surpassed, I'm pretty sure we went about 2-3 months without any rain or very little, so not sure that has been matched.

2018 was drier, as noted by the greater amount of crop failure and wildfires. I think 2020 had the dryest month on record as well.


The main thing is that in 2018 we were able to adapt quicker due to the lower standard deviation from the mean temperatures than in 1976, owing to global warming.
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Regarding the virus and confined spaces, this is interesting.  Caught in Brum. Also, not suprised the chap who succumbed looks overweight.  Knew it, really.  Sad.

 https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021...m-his-life
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(03-30-2021, 04:14 PM)hudds Wrote: Regarding the virus and confined spaces, this is interesting.  Caught in Brum. Also, not suprised the chap who succumbed looks overweight.  Knew it, really.  Sad.

 https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021...m-his-life

Being overweight will hopefully be this generations smoking - hopefully people realise the dangers and start to do something about it early on through education.
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I think the drive to stop people smoking has had the unfortunate side effect of helping the rise in obesity.

From personal experience I found it easier to control hunger and weight when I smoked.
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(03-30-2021, 09:57 PM)foreveralbion Wrote: I think the drive to stop people smoking has had the unfortunate side effect of helping the rise in obesity.

From personal experience I found it easier to control hunger and weight when I smoked.

They're both horrible conditions to have, and once you get into them they can be very difficult to reverse the effects of. I see 1st hand how damaging smoking is and how relatively quickly the irreversible effects are, my M-I-L smoked for most of her life and was still running around for everyone looking after grandkids and doing jobs for everyone at 60; At 70 she struggles to get up to answer the phone.

Obesity is one that creeps up on you as well and takes a lot of hard work and dedication to reverse the obvious effects, and then there are the lingering problems of diabetes, organ damage etc. There really needs to be a concerted effort to educate youngsters in healthy living including diet and exercise to make the future us better equipped to deal with health issues.
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(03-30-2021, 04:14 PM)hudds Wrote: Regarding the virus and confined spaces, this is interesting.  Caught in Brum. Also, not suprised the chap who succumbed looks overweight.  Knew it, really.  Sad.

 https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021...m-his-life

This is really sad. I only did EOTHO once. 

R.e. being overweight, I think the culture of telling people who could obviously do with losing a few pounds that they look "fine" has a lot to answer for. The sort of shit that is rife amongst the Weight Watchers office moms tucking into a packet of crisps for their lunch because "it's only two sins"
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He really doesn't like BFS.

[Image: ExMauY-UcAkzNbu?format=jpg&name=large]
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(03-24-2021, 05:49 PM)baggy1 Wrote: 16th Sept - 929
23rd Sept - 1,439 (1.55 x previous week)
30th Sept - 2,036 (1.41 x pw)
7th Oct - 3,066 (1.51 x pw)
14th Oct - 4,313 (1.41 x pw)
21st Oct - 6,271 (1.45 x pw)
28th Oct - 9,070 (1.45 x pw)
4th Nov - 11,037 (1.22 x pw)
11th Nov - 12,730 (1.15 x pw)
18th Nov - 14,490 (1.14 x pw)
25th Nov - 14,240 (0.98 x pw)
2nd Dec - 13,212 (0.93 x pw)
9th Dec -  13,467 (1.02 x pw)
16th Dec - 15,465 (1.15 x pw)
23rd Dec - 17,834 (1.15 x pw)
30th Dec - 22,713 (1.27 x pw)
6th Jan - 27,727 (1.22 x pw)
13th Jan - 32,689 (1.18 x pw)
20th Jan - 33,886 (1.04 x pw)
27th Jan - 30,846 (0.91 x pw)
3rd Feb - 26,374 (0.86 x pw)
10th Feb - 20,926 (0.79 x pw)
17th Feb - 16,458 (0.79 x pw)
24th Feb - 13,007 (0.79 x pw)
3rd Mar - 9,594 (0.74 x pw)
10th Mar - 6,945 (0.73 x pw)
17th Mar - 5,397 (0.77 x pw)
24th Mar - 4,005 (0.74 x pw)
31st Mar - 3,084 (0.77 x pw)

Another good week in so much as the reduction in the numbers in hospital has continued to decrease at the same rate as before the schools were re-opened. Schools were reopened on the 8th March, the theory is that if serious cases are coming it takes two weeks to filter through to hospital admission which would have been from the 22nd, so we have had nearly two weeks since then with no noticeable increase (or reduction in decrease) so it looks like that part of the restriction easing is safe.

Obviously a big change in easing restrictions over the past couple of days so we will keep monitoring the hospitalisations to see where that takes us. Two weeks from the 29th takes us up to the 12th when there will be further easing with shops and pub gardens opening. So far so good though. Worth pointing out that it was the end of June when we had the equivalent number in hospital and we were on the down slope like now but that does indicate that, if we follow the same trend, we are in for a decent few months and hopefully the vaccinations should mean that we don't have an upturn later in the summer.

Also the vaccination programme carries on at pace with over 31M now having received their 1st dose which is nearly 60% of the over 18s. That does make that discussion about vaccine passports moot really but expect to see it still being discussed for a while longer to ensure the take-up continues. Added to that there are 4.5M who have had both doses which is just under 9% of the adult population.

Compare this to the continent (and in fact the majority of the rest of the world) and it does show how far ahead we are. All positive news and being completed at a sensible pace to enable reaction time to any blips.
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